Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 1 decade ago

What parts of Christianity were borrowed from Pagan religion?

Is there a good article (or few) on this subject?

Hit me with whatever you've got.

27 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
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  • may
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Parts Of Christianity

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  • Joan
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Eucharist, baptism, salvation, dying saviour deities who go down into the underworld briefly, incarnate deity, triadic forms of worship, high god fathers/human mothers, mastery over grain/bread, grapes/wine and fish, eternal torture, eternal punishment for transgressions and the underworld as the location, original sin, hellfire, light v dark imagery, Logos/Word, the Holy Spirit. I'm sure I'm forgetting a few, but you get the idea. :-) In other words - the heart, soul, core, and centre of Christianity. There would be no Christianity without Hellenic salvation religions.

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  • Mr. E
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Other than the obvious holidays there are some other core beliefs that most Christians don't even realize have pagan roots.

    Immortal soul

    Eternal torment

    Sunday worship

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Early Christians were masters of conversion. They didn't tell the pagans of Europe that they were wrong, just that Their God was the only god, and the Pagan gods were lesser demons. Instead of outlawing old holidays, they were adapted to the Christian belief, making conversion more acceptable.

    I think it would be a shorter list of wasn't borrowed from other religions.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Well there is Mithraism. Mithras was a Roman Sun god, honored on sundays, born of a virgin, born at winter solstice (which is a few days before Christmas). There is speculation that perhaps the church "borrowed" mithras....somewhat convincing since it was Constatine who had the bible put together and Rome is where Christianity gained in popularity.

    Also some of their practices. Christmas tree is also a Yule tree. A star atop this tree was common long before the Christmas tree was instituted. Easter eggs were also around before the Church began Easter observances. If you watch a Catholic Mass, you will see pagan influence. Incense, chanting, singing, Eucharist (many pagans had cakes & ale in honor of their god/desses)..etc etc. I think that is why I was originally attracted to Catholicism lol.

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  • 1 decade ago

    As a major example, when they were trying to make Christianity the national religion, they moved Jesus' birth to coincide with the winter solstice celebration of the pagans. This was a day where they would sing naked through the streets, eat a lot, and generally be merry. There is your carol singing and the like.

    Easter was a pagan ritual, again adopted by Christianity to make it easier to worm into society.

    Jesus' whole life is a copy of Mithras.

    Simply go to www.jesusneverexisted.com and you'll find plenty of articles on the subject, with references and sources.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Christmas and Easter are both pagan.

    For Christmas, the date, tree, and eating pork is based on the life of Nimrod.

    For Easter, EVERYTHING is based on Babylonian worship of the goddess of fertility. Even the holiday is named after her.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Practically everything. E.g. the God Odin hung on a tree for 9 days, with a wound in his side, then was resurrected and saw the Runes, i.e. sacred characters of Norse mythology.

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  • Laura
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    The idea of a god in human form. The idea of a dying and rising god. The idea of a god coming to earth by being born of a human woman. The idea of a god saving humanity from some form of eternal death or damnation. The idea of prayer. The idea of sacrifice. The idea of initiation with water. The idea of miracles. The list goes on.

    If you want a better explanation than this, POCM is extremely thorough, laying out facts, possible reasons for those facts, and the author's personal opinions in clearly labeled sections. Some parts of the website are incomplete or undergoing renovation, but the vast majority of it is clear and legible.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Oh wow - not so much borrowed but adapted. Search 'missionary adaptation'.

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