How important is the Constitution of the United States in everyday life?

1. How important is the Constitution of the United States in everyday life?

2. Is all outside communication made by a company which sells a product or service considered "commercial speech"?

3. Can a company make public comments without intending directly or indirectly to promote its product? Why or why not?

4. What limits, if any, should be in place for such speech?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    The Constitution of The United States of America is still as strong as it ever was.

    The problem is that politicians and courts have surreptitiously redefined and amended it with other "defining" laws to the point it's no longer taken as it was intended.

    Freedom... any freedom... cannot be exercised by one at the expense of another. The "rights" of a minority cannot be exercised at the expense of the majority. Yet, that's exactly what the laws passed by politicians and upheld and interpreted by the courts have allowed... no... induced.

    Freedom of speech, intended to keep the state from infringing on a person's freedom of dissent, has become so convoluted that it now extends to "expression" of any kind. So, in the 1960s and 70s it became ok to destroy government property and prevent law-abiding people from conducting their own lives... because doing so was only exercising their "freedom of expression." Now, when somebody wants to get a new, big screen HDTV, all he has to do is start a political or social protest (riot) and he can take what he wants for free.

    And, because some seem unable to differentiate between what they want, and the rights of others, we've had to institute laws against slander and libel.

    The right to keep and bear arms has had to be curtailed because there are a lot of morons who think it means that they can use firearms... or any weapon... as a means to settle squabbles with their neighbors... or that they may be utilized in a political or social protest (riot) to impress the validity of ones opinion upon others.

    Freedom of the press has been corrupted to the point that the press feel immune to any prosecution for anything they print. Moreover, they seem to think that a press pass is equivalent to a Top Secret clearance. And they've convinced the public that the media know what's best for the public to know.

    So, in answer to question 1... The importance of the Constitution hasn't diminished. But the content has been so misconstrued and misinterpreted that the intent is lost. The effect has been all but destroyed.

    2 and 3. I'm averse to any organization trying to push a cause by linking it to its products or services surreptitiously. It's kind of a gray area because some people tend to have a difficult time differentiating between what an organization does (or sells) from the actions and the positions it takes. When a corporation does a good thing, some are bound to think, "Good for some free advertising." When such an organization does something bad, they think, "That's going to hurt their stock." Companies and organizations that are less identifiable seem less vulnerable.

    I'm equally averse to organizations pushing their product or service in the name of some cause... especially if the cause isn't related to the product or service they provide. Churches are notorious for doing just that. Preachers are always pounding the pulpit about some political cause. There's a separation between church and state... and it works both ways. The state can't tell the churches how to do their thing. Neither can the churches try to tell the state how to do its thing. People have to do what they think is best. An organization can't vote... only its members can. And it's up to the organization to instill its values by example, not by directive, and then to let its membership/employees/customers to vote as they see fit.

    4. The limits on freedom of speech should be those placed there by common sense. However, that apparently lacking in many, how about the concept of precedent... if you don't want me to say something you don't like, don't say anything I might not like. I'm bound by the same concept. That doesn't mean we can't disagree. But we can't resort to name-calling, slurs, or the other things to which so many resort when they run out of logical arguments.

    And, for those who lack common sense, and who can't grasp the concept of precedent, we have laws against slander and libel, and defamation of character. We also have laws to prevent breaches of national security.

    Can anybody think of any commercial organization(s) inclined to openly and notoriously ignore these concepts and laws?

    Come on... they're well known.

    Political parties... especially the two major parties... and especially during campaigns.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Ideally it should be very important. But there are those that would overlook the constitution for their own gain. Article 2. Section 1. paragraph 5. states that to be President of the United States one must be a Natural Born American Citizen. Well if you are born a British Citizen, due to you dad's British Citizenship you can never be considered a true Natural Born American Citizen. So why do we have that usurper setting in our White House? Why did he just appoint a woman for Justice on the Supreme Court that publicly admitted she will legislate from the bench and therefore destroy our Constitution. Our Constitution is being destroyed. We have to save it ASAP!

  • 1 decade ago

    1. Extremely important. Without the Constitution I might not be able to practice my religion, speak my mind, I might be hassled by the police, etc. The Constitution protects me from the government.

    2. Might I refer you to Valentine v. Chrestensen. There are odd examples where a company spokesperson is not trying to sell te product/service, but most of the time they are.

    3. Yes, absolutely. A company can make any comments they want.

    4. I don't want ANY limits on free speech. Speech isn't free if there are certain things that can't be said.

  • 4 years ago

    Constitution is very important for us not to have chaos, for it is the rule of the land that rich or poor need to follow. Yes, for whatever news they allow the public to know will make or break their product I don't think so, for they will be protecting their own interest Anything that involve lies to upgrade their product or diminish the competition's interest. Hope This helps

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  • 3 years ago

    Freedom... any freedom... cannot be exercised by one at the expense of another. The "rights" of a minority cannot be exercised at the expense of the majority. Yet, that's exactly what the laws passed by politicians and upheld and interpreted by the courts have allowed... no... induced.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The Constitution is dead. R.I.P. 1790 - 2008

  • 1 decade ago

    not as important as my three fifty seven

    or my nine millimeter

    or my three eighty

    or my russian seven six two by fifty four

    Source(s): mis bolas
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