Brooke asked in PetsDogs · 1 decade ago

Would it be ok to introduce a 9 week old rottweiler to an 8 year old german shepard?

Well we have had out German shepard since he was 6 weeks old, he is very healthy and in his whole life has been to the vet twice because he backed into a glass fish tank when he got scared and had to have stitches, other than that he has been fine. Me and my sister take him on a walk nearly everyday and if we cant take him out then he is able to run around in the back garden, he is aggressive but my dad has got him to be ok with my uncles German shepard which is also male and also 2 female staffs, he also got friendly with a male boxer who kept coming into out back garden. My dads friend has asked if he would like a 9 week old rottweiler puppy. He said he would ask to ask my mum and if she said yes he would have to go meet the puppy with the dog we already have, and of out dog now is ok with the puppy we may have him. My dog now since getting older is a lot calmer but still aggressive (he is a guard dog).

Do you think the puppy would be ok, because i though that if my dog sees that it is a puppy then there wont be any danger to my dad, but could i be wrong?

Update:

We need a guard dog because if you lived on my street you would know why, people's houses getting robbed, cars being robbed and burnt, houses being burt (with people in!). Its for our own safety and he is happy so whats the point in stopping him, if he gets told off for doing something he has been doing for most of his life it would confuse him.

Update 2:

Well what my dad has done in the past, is put both dogs on a lesh, he holds my dog then my sister holds the other and then let them look at eachother, then if my dog isnt barking or trying to get at the other dog he lets them closer and closer until they are like sniffing eachother, he leaves them like this for about 5 minutes then if they seem fine he lets them off the lesh then if they are fine he lets them in the house.

Update 3:

His protective of my dad, me, my 2 sisters, my big sisters boyfriend , my mum, my auntie and her ex then her 2 kids but when my cousin was born 3 years ago and he met my dog for the first time my dog didnt do anything, and now my cousin sits next to my dog eating chocolate and stuff and sometimes gives my dog chocolate or what ever he is eating. My dog itnt dominant, when we had a dog which was dominant he was scared to be around her and when they were down stairs at night he would try to come in mine and my sisters room to get away from her, and because his bed was under the stairs and my mum and dad put one under the stairs for her too he would choose to sleep near the front door instead of on his bed near her. He is very trained, and does what he is told most of the time.

10 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    It should be ok, older dogs normally dont say anything to pups, they have more patience for them than adults. Start by introducing them at a neutral place such as on ur daily walk somewhere nearby ur house, so that the GS is not territorial, making them meet 1st time at a neutral spot should take care of any territory issues ur GS has. Then make them meet same way for 3-4 times, n let them be on friendly terms before u introduce them at ur house. But since ur GS is a male n more prone to be temperamental sometime if the pup tests his patience, try to supervise them for the first few meetings. I have introduced 2pups to our older dogs, one by one, no probs absolutely. The key is to let them 1st meet at a neutral place, as suddenly a new dogs/pups entry in a house can be seen/interpreted as intrusion and get wrong reactions. Dogs are social animals n they bond quickly to other dogs, n enjoy their company more than humans. Best combo's are male-female and female-female, male-male can sometimes be a problem.....Best of Luck !

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    There is so much stuff in this question that it's going to take a bit to answer.

    1) You say your 8-yr-old dog's been to the vet only twice, once because of a traumatic injury with a fish tank. He should've gone to the vet every year, for a checkup and vaccinations. Hopefully, your parents took him for his yearlies, and you just weren't aware...?

    2) You don't need a "Guard Dog" regardless of where you live. Our 11-year-old Brittany, who's a sweetie-pie to everyone we let in our house, puts up a vicious-sounding, violent-looking, barking at someone who's on our property...Just last week, I had a guy here to check our A/C unit, and had put our sweet old Britt in the backyard. When she trotted around to the side of the house where she could see the guy monkeying with our A/C unit, she started a nasty, vicious barking that almost scared ME.

    3) NEVER EVER EVER EVER feed a dog (or allow someone else to feed it) chocolate!!! It's TOXIC, and in big enough quantities (smaller than you might think), it could KILL your dog!

    4) Chances are good that your dog and the pup could get along ok, if you're careful with the introduction, but please have some compassion for your older dog -- He will get very weary of the pup's desire to constantly play. You'd need to make sure that the pup gets enough exercise and training so that it's not trying to bother your older dog for attention and play.

    5) Never disregard your older dog in favor of the pup. If you're petting the older dog, and the pup barges in for attention, ignore the pup as you continue petting your older dog.

    6) On the other hand, don't let your older dog rule how you interact with the pup. If you're training or petting the pup, and the older dog barges in, don't give in to the older dog's advances, and just continue focusing on the pup.

    There's a lot more to know than anyone can impart in this forum, so I'd suggest some reading: "The Other End of the Leash" or "How To Be The Leader Of the Pack", both by Dr. Patricia McConnell.

    Good luck & best wishes.

    Source(s): 20+ years dog owner/trainer
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  • The way to introduce a dog to another dog is stick its butt onto the nose of the older dog. Do not worry about the pup, as the pup will accept whatever is thrown at it.

    If I read your explanation correctly, it seems you and your family have good intentions with your dogs, which makes me believe you have little to worry about. Allowing the pup in contact with the adult dog is good for building anti-bodies, in the pup. I do not believe in chemicals, unless absolutely necessary. I support the natural, alternative and homoeopathic approach and is ultimately your choice to make.

    Eating chocolate is the same thing. I have no problem with a dog eating chocolate, but like with some humans, certain dogs are allergic so you need to make sure you do not offer something that will harm your dog(s). I would be very careful during feeding time. Only when you know that you can trust them together can you feed them together. Gaining the trust from the adult dog, ensure he is not made to feel neglected or receives less attention than the pup. He sounds like a good dog and secure within himself. It is a pity about the fish tank, but I do not think this had a harmful affect on him.

    Little and often is the best way to handle this situation. Each time you bring the pup out, allow him more time with the older dog and make a big fuss of the older dog. When the mature dog raises his lip, because pups can make them nervous, immediately respond with a grunt or a no or whatever sound you make when he is naughty. Hopefully this will help him understand to back off. Be prepared for the odd squabble in the future, as a lively pup can annoy a mature dog, mainly when it gets near his head. Try supervision as long as possible and always be prepared, until they have totally accepted one another.

    Good luck. The most successful introductions are with dogs who are on a healthy nutritious diet and feel appreciated by their owners. These are the key ingredients to successful pack integrations. German Shepherds however are known to suffer from genetic unpredictable schizophrenic reactions. Depending on how stable your dog's genes are will determine a peaceful relationship.

    Source(s): www.caninehilton.co.uk NITZSCHE PWCP Method NITZSCHE PEPPU Technique Holistic Healing4U
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  • 1 decade ago

    Sinse your dog seems is a guard dog and he is protector of your father? (<< is that right?) I would suggest taking precautions, having the two dogs meet a few times away from either ones home (mainly yours) let them get acquainted, also I would suggest your father not pay too much attention to the pup at first as your dog WILL see that as a threat, puppy or not!!! And frankly your dog will not care too much whether its a puppy or not, the dog is either a threat or not, thats how dogs see others, especially dominant dogs. Once you are comfortable with how both dogs are getting along (if they do) then at the same time take them both to the house, but stay out the front and let them do their thing there, and gradually move into the house, But as with any new pup, keep a constant eye on it, and dont be afraid to correct your older dog if he steps out of line.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I have a shepherd too.

    She is quite protective of me & others in the family. & very protective of our house. I think it's just in their nature. So I wouldn't say your dog is "a spoiled bad mannered brat"

    It does sound like he might need some more socializing, & what better way to start than introducing him to other dogs. If he has shown aggression to other dog's the only way to make it better it to teach him that other dogs are okay. I'd slowly allow the dogs to meet & keep an eye on them when they are together.

    Most dogs are pretty good with puppies in my experience. So I'd say give it a try.

    Source(s): another shepherd owner
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    They're babies!!!!!

    As long as they are still on their mama's natural antibodies and are current on their shots, socializing dogs at that age is an excellent idea. Don't let people tell you otherwise. If the dogs are protective of their people, that's good. But dogs must know how to play with eachother throughout their lives. Especially if the other one doesn't have guard dog duties.

    You go for it!

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  • 1 decade ago

    make sure that before you introduce them to take both of them on a long walk. put the german shepherd in a room for a while. Hold your puppy in your arm when you walk into the room. now you can see his first reaction to the puppy whithout putting it in danger. If he is acting ok then calmly set the puppy down. make sure that both the puppy and the german shepherd are on leashes! let them sniff each other. they should get along fine! good luck!

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  • Sybil
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    It sounds like your dog is easily socialized with other dogs. Your dad is introducing them the right way too. Give it a go and see how they get on. Good luck

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  • 1 decade ago

    puppy should not be close to adult dogs untill the recieve at least first 2 shots for parvo virus.

    period.

    its a rule that most people know, and its for puppys own good.

    Source(s): my personal vet
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    He's a gaurd dog = He's an ill mannered untrained brat. Train your dog there is no reason he needs to gaurd you from other dogs. If both dogs are trained and socialized they will be fine. If not then neither owner is fit to have a dog of those breeds!

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