Anonymous
Anonymous asked in PetsDogs · 1 decade ago

Why doesn't my dog like black people?

I'm not racist in any way whatsoever, but my dog seems to be. Whenever he sees a black person, he barks wildly, and whenever my black friend comes over, he barks at her, than is mean to her if she tries to touch him. Does anyone know why he is like this?

16 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Color blindness doesn't apply, as light/dark and red/green are two very different areas. And the light/dark thing could explain it, if your dog had a bad experience. Dogs don't really have any ability to be racist, but they do make associations. My first dog was calm around my mother and I when we got her, but even at six months old she was terrified of my father. She ran away from him and wouldn't let him pet her for ages. Phobias of a certain size, color, gender, etc. can result from either bad puppyhood experience or something more random.

    Barring that, it's very possible that either you or your friend, or both of you, are tense because of your expectations of what will happen. Were you worried in advance of whether he would like her because your friend's feelings are important to you, and you wanted them very badly to get along? Does your friend have a fear of dogs, or might she have been tense at the time because she wasn't sure how he would act? Dogs pick up on our own human feelings better than we do, their sense of smell is unbelievable, and if your dog sensed tension in the air from somebody he might have picked up a bad association. It's the same as if you see a stranger or friend stop and tense up and start looking wary; even without a word exchanged, you feel like there must be a reason the person got that way.

    More so, if a person tries to reach out and pet a dog when the animal isn't in the mood or is still nervous at meeting someone new, that can cause problems. So if at their first meeting he wasn't feeling like being touched and the two of you didn't realize he was unsure of himself, her touching him may have sparked mistrust or fear in him. Or even just grumpiness.

    At any rate, the best thing to do now is to treat the matter as practically as possible. It really is very solvable as long as you follow one rule--you are never, ever helpless, because human brains are much more complex and sophisticated than dog brains, and dog brains respect determination and perseverance above all else. Your dog wants to see humans as the leaders because deep down, they know their two-footed friends are innately better suited for the position, but many dogs are still either too spunky or too independent to give up that spot automatically. This can be fun, but also frustrating, and having a determined dog means you always have to be at least one inch more determined. It takes practice.

    You and your friend should make a pact to help the dog get over this, and the best way to do this is by her not paying too much attention to him--making an active effort to be calm and cool and remind herself that she is the human and he is the dog. She should act like she is the popular girl at school and he is a big dork in silly pants that she doesn't have to pay attention to. Meanwhile, you should make it as clear to your dog as possible that you are no longer going to tolerate his actions. Not with words; words can actually make things worse because the lack of response to them can make you nervous, so if there's talking it should be between you and your friend. But if you quietly and firmly give your dog a nudge in the neck (just like his mom would when he was a puppy; the sort of poke you'd give someone to get their attention quickly) and stay calm and focused on the way you would prefer him to behave, then as long as you never give up he will eventually get it.

    If he ends up sending truly calm signals and relaxing around your friend, then she can relent and let him sniff her, then eventually pet him and give him treats. But going by instinct and intuition is best here. Your little four-footed buddy just needs a bit of help to understand that he doesn't need to act the way he's been acting. Negative associations take a lot of gradual steps and dedication to cure. Extra exercise can help immensely--a tired dog will be less inclined to be nervous or stubborn!

    I know it's hard work, and sometimes a very subtle task at that. I'm not sure how well I've helped, but best of luck to you, your friend, and your dog.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It's simply because your dog hasn't seen enough black people. If he rarely sees people in hats, he could just as easily be afraid of people in hats.

    What do you do when he barks? Do you do anything at all to train him? Or when your black friend comes over? And you absolutely NEVER force a dog to submit to someone he's afraid of touching him. You're just asking that dog to learn to bite. He has to be the one to decide if and when he's going to approach anyone.

    You can counter-condition your dog to stop being afraid. When you see someone black approaching, start giving him bite-size, high-value treats BEFORE he gets over threshold and starts barking. Keep on treating him, talk softly, until the person has passed, then the treats stop.

    Do the same thing with your friend - and also teach him "no bark". He'll eventually learn to associate black people (or anyone else he's afraid of) with a good thing - lots of treats.

  • 1 decade ago

    my dogs the same way. If the dog lives around a person of a certain color, even if they see black and white, they normally see you in white, and if they see a black person,it's a different color than they're used to, so they are naturally suspicious, and don't trust him/her, so they bark.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Dogs are not completely colorblind, as some people like to think, they just can't see the spectrum we can.

    That said, some dogs react that way because they suffered abuse from someone that looks a certain way. (i.e. Male, hispanic, black, etc)

    Otherwise, dogs pickup on their surroundings and emotions. If someone feels or acts defensively they react accordingly.

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 1 decade ago

    It's to do with socialisation as a puppy. Did you have many coloured people coming over to the house in the vital months when you socialised the puppy? It's far more common than people think. So your dog isn't racist, he is just confused or scared or unsure.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    maybe you dont socialize with black ppl as much and ur dogs notice that and see them as a threat or something, or maybe the dog pick up ur intuition, u R probably racist and u dont know it,lol

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    dogs see black and white, and so to him/her a black person can look really dark. also, becasue the person is human, its skin gives off a warm heat, causing the darkness seem alot darker to the dog. most dogs dont have a problem with this, but depending on ur dog's eyes, the way he detects black, can b different. it can he veeeeerrryy dark to him

  • He probably had a bad experience with a black person. Dogs get that way sometimes. Maybe he had a black owner who mistreated him or something.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I had one like that when I was a kid and he never got over it, however I would imagine with some specialized training that can be changed

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    i could be that he was beaten by a black person at one time or another. My godmothers dog didn't like men b/c a man abused her when she was younger. its just something you gotta live with.

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.