Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentMilitary · 1 decade ago

Military Service Obligation?

So, I'm considering joining the National Guard. I was reading online and I saw, "The military service obligation is eight years. The Army National Guard offers three, four, six or eight years active Guard enlistment options with the balance of the time spent in the Individual Ready Reserves (non-drill status), or Inactive National Guard." I was curious, if I served 3 years active, and my remaining 5 years in "Inactive National Guard" during that time would it be possible to switch to another branch of the military?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Yes, the obligation is 8 years. Split however you pretty much want. And when you finish your active duty time, their is nothing keeping you from joining another branch. Its just that 8 years is your obligation... so if you do say....3 active years in the guard, and get out and decide to be perhaps....a MARINE, you only would have a 5 years active duty contract.

    Now, say you get out after 4 years of active duty, the chances of you be recalled back to deploy are very high. They go after inactive reserve alot.

    And once they call you back, you're going with whatever unit they tell you, so why not re-enlist and get stationed where you want, and maybe even a bonus? It's definitely a smart idea, thats what i done.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The Sgt that answered above is correct to an extent. Only the Army and Marine Corps arecurrently recalling alot of IRRs up. If you join the Navy or Air Force you probably won't get messed with if you decide to get out after your first enlistment.

    Source(s): Me: Fmr Cpl EAS:2005 (for you Marines)
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  • Mrsjvb
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    you can TRY. no guarantees that it will happen. Most Branches are currently NOT taking PS unless you can go directly into an undermanned job with no training.

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