Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 1 decade ago

Shinnyo-en, Surbiton?

I live near a Shinnyo-en centre in surbiton, and i am thinking about becoming buddhist so i was wondering whether there was anyone out there who goes and could tell me what you do there and whether i would be able to go, even though im not actually buddhist

Thanks

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Here's some information to help you make up your mind.

    Crucifixion exists as a potential punishment within the Koran (5:32-34):

    5:32-34 ...If any one slew a person - unless it be as punishment for murder or for spreading corruption in the land - it would be as if he slew the whole people: and if any one saved a life, it would be as if he saved the life of the whole people. Then although there came to them Our apostles with clear signs, yet, even after that, many of them continued to commit excesses in the land. The punishment of those who wage war against Allah and His Messenger, and strive with might and main for mischief through the land is: execution, or crucifixion, or the cutting off of hands and feet from opposite sides, or exile from the land: that is their disgrace in this world, and a heavy punishment is theirs in the Hereafter; Except for those who repent before they fall into your power: in that case, know that Allah is Oft-forgiving, Most Merciful.

    Crucifixion exists as a potential punishment within the Koran (5:33):

    The punishment of those who wage war against Allah and His Messenger, and strive with might and main for mischief through the land is: execution, or crucifixion, or the cutting off of hands and feet from opposite sides, or exile from the land: that is their disgrace in this world, and a heavy punishment is theirs in the Hereafter.

    The Saudi Arabian case involved Scotsman Sandy Mitchell:

    Sandy Mitchell, the Scot placed under sentence of death in Saudi Arabia, has revealed he was due to be executed by crucifixion, writes Christopher Claire. Mitchell said he was told by his Saudi lawyer that the sentence called for the victim’s head to be "partially" severed and the body fixed to an X-shaped cross in public view for three days.

    Public beheadings are routine in Saudi Arabia, but crucifixion is reserved as an exemplary punishment under sharia (Islamic) law for crimes of the utmost severity. Two highway robbers have been executed in this way in the past 20 years.

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