Do you interpret Israel as Literal or symbolic in the bible?

In the new testament also,some say Israel is meant to be taken symbolically(the heavenly Jerusalem),not the literal place you see on the map,others say it is the literal place-Your thoughts?

Update:

Nate-wherever it refers to" God's Holy City",and the "New Jerusalem"it's all throughout the bible.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I imagine the NT authors--generally Jewish converts to the infant cult of the man Jesus--believed that Israel would occupy a special place in the plan of God. Over time, however, as Gentile converts began to outnumber Jewish towards the end of the First Century, people probably began to take the Israel references as symbolic.

    What does God think? Only God knows, would be my response.

    Source(s): Atheist
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    the word ‘Israel’ is a compound of three units, Is - Ra - and El. Is could well be an abbreviation or shortened form of Isis, the Egyptian goddess of motherhood. Even the Hebrew word for "woman" is isha (issa). The Ra comes direct from the great Egyptian father of spirit, Ra; and El is the Hebrew singular word for God. It would then read "Mother-Father-God," precisely what its generic character would make appropriate. The Hebrew heritage was drawn from Egypt, and in that land the name of the Divine Father-principle not associated with Ra was Osiris; significantly enough the original name of this deity was Asar (Azar). The Hebrews carried this very name forward in the title of their High Priest, who stood for the spiritual fatherhood, EL(e)azar and again Azariah. (It was the Greeks who made Azar into Osiris.) The spiritual progeny of this God were called the children of Azar, and with the addition of the Hebrew El, God, as "Azar-el-ites."

    this insinuates that the Israelites were a denomination of an Egyptian mystery religion and not a race of people or a nation.

    Source(s): ST
  • 1 decade ago

    Literal. The new Jerusalem is going to be the city were God rules the earth in his second coming. Prophetically speaking Jews are training priests for the rebuilding of the Temple. There is a catch 22 with biblical prophecy, all prophecy is write in poetic verse....that was the custom at the time, so you have to get the symbolism with the historical and cultural context of the time so that you can get the meaning of what the prophet is trying to convey as to the future.

    Source(s): Hal Lindsay, Jack Van Impee, John Walvord, Dwight Pentecost, Billy Grahm and Pat Robertson are good theologins and writers on the subject.
  • 1 decade ago

    If a person takes the Bible and compares it with historical evidence I think they will see that Israel is a literal Land and family of people.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Israel was God's chosen people to bring the "Good News" to the world. After Jesus paid the price of our sin debt, to redeem us from bondage and give us eternal life the Church was born. When the Bible talks about "the Israel of God" (Gal.6:15,16); "a true Jew" (Rom.2:28,29) it is talking about those who have placed their faith in Jesus Christ. Ephesians Ch. 2 talks about how there is no difference between Jew and Gentile believers.

    There are only two distinct groups of people in the world (according to the Bible) those who are "in Christ" and those who are not. I take the Bible literally, but you have to determine if it is talking literally spiritual or literally physical.

  • 1 decade ago

    I think that the Jew's right to the literal land is little more than "we came in here a few thousand years back and killed everybody else, so it's ours". Maybe then it's symbolical?

  • jaicee
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    The Bible is a spiritual book addressed to the eternal human soul. Any spiritual significance takes precedence over any incidental literal truth.

    People mistakenly become attached to names rather than reality which impedes understanding the essential message of the Bible, which is spiritual.

    Literalism kills understanding. Even dear Paul warned and argued against this literalism in Corinthians, as even in his day he could see its disastrous effect in the Christian community.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Israel is literal. This is how God has made Himself known to all people. So we would know who the Holy Spirit is.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    In the Bible Israel is the name of Jacob, and is a people, not a place, his descendants.

    By the way, "we came in here a few thousand years back and killed everybody else" is how ALL countries got started.

  • 1 decade ago

    In my opinion, it shoud be interpreted as symbolic, as everything else in any religious text.

    One thing I disagree with is people using a religious text as an excuse for the occupation of land (yes, Palestine), like someone else answered before me.

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