castleviewgrey asked in PetsHorses · 1 decade ago

Surface for a riding arena....?

I'm going to make a riding surface at home and will be using woodchippings as I have unlimited access to it! do I need to mix it with anything or will it get slippery? has anybody got woodchippings as a surface at home? If so, maybe you could tell me how it works for you! All help appreciated! Thankyou

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I would recommend the nike type footing (which is basically sand mixed with rubber), although this is one of the most expensive. It is very cushy under hooves and seems to bounce back really well instead of turn into straight mud and puddle up when it rains. Woodchips would seem uncomfortable because they are so large and could get stuck in hooves or stick a horse in the legs. Some small, private barns use sandbox type sand. If you want to use sand, make sure there are no large rocks in it. Sawdust works nicely but I would only recommend it in an indoor or covered because it clumps when it gets wet and gets soggy and hard. You could always just have a nice, mud free grass arena, all you would need is a nice level field that drains well and some fencing. If you have an indoor or covered arena you always have the choice of dirt too, as long as it wont get soaked when it rains because dirt and rain equal mud. But, whatever surface you choose, make sure your base layers underneath are taken care of and compacted and make sure you're top layer is deep enough. Good Luck!

    Source(s): 3 day eventer riding/training 10 years
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  • 1 decade ago

    In my experience, nothing can beat a sand and rubber arena. Even tho they are more expensive to begin with, they last and are rideable almost every day. Woodchip seems to degrade after a few years, turns to mush and rots which leads to flooding, uneven ground and the arena becomes unrideable. Even when u add more woodchips, the underlying rot is still there causing a lack of drainiage and making the arena "swampy"

    Source(s): I have been to many livery yards with my horses and the arena situation has always been the same. woodchip no good and sand/rubber the best.
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  • 1 decade ago

    What ever you use if you do not deal with the foundations properly you will be wasting your money. You can cheat by raising the base with compressed chalk and ensure there is a 4 inch drop to the sides to assist with the removal of water and then put in a mix of sand and chips. I have ridden on many surfaces - cheap and expensive - and you must ensure that your surface is correct for your equestrian use - i.e. dressage would be different to jumping or carriage driving. The BHS bookshop at Kenilworth, Coventry might be able to advise.

    Source(s): experience!!
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  • free
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Irregardless of regardless of if or not your horse has shoes you does not prefer something that could desire to %.. there are various surfaces obtainable yet to be truthful Sand remains in my opinion the excellent. you are able to mixture it with different products which includes floor rubber, or shavings with it. mixing in slightly salt will additionally end it from freezing. do not use something with clay in it as this might %. problematic as rock. Hog gas or Bark Mulch is likewise a stable footing even nevertheless it should be harrowed greater in many situations as that's going to %. and grow to be uneven alongside the song or on the take off factor of a leap. the clarification your horse replaced into sinking your college is probable because of the fact this is merely too deep. Sand should not be any deeper than approximately 3 inches, in case you began with 4 inches or so it would be nice because of the fact the backside inch or so will ultimately %. into the airborne dirt and dirt on the backside. Any deeper than this and you're inquiring on your horse to blow a tendon! stable success!!!

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  • keerok
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Didn't pay much attention to details when I was at the club but I recall them using sawdust. The goal is to make it soft as possible so try to remove all stones before pouring the chips in. Make sure the chips aren't so big that may get stuck under the hooves.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I would recommend sand - our sand school used to have wood chippings in it but we decided to switch to sand as we heard it was better for everyday use and its softer for when the horses are jumping. xx

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