Elle asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 1 decade ago

Cherokee translation help?

Does anyone know what "Wado", a Cherokee word, means in English?

11 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    O'siyo,(Cherokee "hello!"),

    Wado is "thanks" in an informal, everyday form. A'wado ,(aah wa doe),

    is more formal and should be used to show respect, as to Elders or beloved leaders or in mixed company . There are some good online Cherokee language sites. Check out a few!

    Tali Kogi

  • 3 years ago

    Cherokee Translation

  • 4 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Cherokee translation help?

    Does anyone know what "Wado", a Cherokee word, means in English?

    Source(s): cherokee translation help: https://bitly.im/I3OwF
  • 4 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/awede

    I regularly consult the New American Bible, New American Standard Bible, Revised Standard Version, New Revised Standard Version and New International Version. The NASB and RSV are more technically precise, while the NAB, NRSV and NIV are good compromises between literalism and sense-based translation. When I am especially interested in a passage, I'll even delve into the Nestle-Aland Greek or the Mazoretic Hebrew. I avoid King James because it is archaic, a revision of earlier translations and based on a defective source.

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  • 4 years ago

    "The Message" is wonderful for "just reading", but horrible for study. For beginners who have come to believe they "should" read the Bible but may not have the fortitude for a "real" Bible, I highly recommend "The Message". And even for those who are conversant with the Bible, I highly recommend "The Message" if for no other reason than because it often makes you go, "Hmm, does the BIble really say THAT?!", giving you a new perspective on many passages you thought you knew. For study, I prefer something more literal, like the NASB or RSV, or even (shudder!), the KJV. Better yet is a cross-comparison of these multiple versions. Better yet would be the original Greek and Hebrew versions, but that's beyond many of us. (However, if you weren't raised on the KJV but are insistent on reading it, I suggest learning Greek instead of archaic English; it's almost the same amount of work and would be much more valuable.) For something in between I think the NIV and the NKJV are pretty good, but lately I've begun to become somewhat impressed with the Holman Christian Standard Bible. It's as readable as the NIV, but seems to be more literally accurate. A couple of nits: I'm bothered that so many versions hide the name of God behind the man-made practice of substituting for it the phrase "the LORD". I'm also bothered that so many versions retain archaic English in prayer passages when the rest of the text is modern, as if archaic English is somehow more holy or reverent (when actually it violates the principle God gave us for speaking clearly in the people's street language when He inspired the NT in "street Greek"). At any rate, I'd consider the best version of the Bible to be the one that gets read. The worst version is the one that sits on a shelf, revered as Holy and accurate, but gathering dust.

  • 3 years ago

    So, what is "your welcome" in Cherokee? I used to know.

  • 3 years ago

    how do u say warrior in Cherokee?

  • 1 decade ago

    It means thank you

    Source(s): Don't need no references I'm a walking Keetoowah Cherokee dictionary
  • 1 decade ago

    It means thank you! pronounced wah-doh

  • 4 years ago

    oginalli

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