Has music ever actually been destroyed through ignorance or repression?

I don't mean "butchering" music through poor interpretation, or shoddy composing like you-know-what. I mean actually destroying music, for example by burning manuscripts or trying to eradicate pieces (even if it isn't successful). Have you ever heard of anything like this?

I'm wondering, because it has happened many times with art and a few times with literature; I don't even know whether it's possible to destroy music, but it seems possible if the work is unpublished. Here are some of the worst art tragedies I've ever heard:

-The Russian Czars cutting up great medieval Flemish tapestries for use as seat cushions

-The Turks storing gunpowder in the Parthenon (yeah, it *used* to be perfectly preserved)

-The Vatican melting the bronze roof of the Pantheon in the 1600's to make altarpieces

-The Iraqi Museum (don't believe the US government- it was not just "a bunch of pots," it was 6000-year-old masterpieces from the Fertile Crescent)

Has music ever been destroyed in such a way? Or do you think it's impossible to destroy music in the same way as art? I remember something about Shostakovich hiding scores during Stalin's purges, but I don't know whether they were his own music or whether they were Bach's WTC... ?

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Update:

OK, thanks!, but maybe I should be more specific. I know about the Chinese Communists and Nazi Germany, but does anyone know if they actually succeeded in destroying all traces of the music? Even if China banned Western art, it didn't "destroy" it- but the Soviets may have really destroyed great music. And the Nazis- ?? I doubt all those works were copied elsewhere...

[I forgot the Maya Codices! Destroyed by the Spanish because they were "Books of the Devil"- grrr... I agree on the Native Americans, but wasn't the Lighthouse of Alexandria an accident? Still a tragedy though :)]

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  • hafwen
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    During Soviet rule, Estonia experienced a brutal attempted eradication of its national identity - deportation of intellectuals, burning of literature, destruction of historical monuments - and they were not allowed to play their own folk music.

    Folk music, of course, relies heavily on oral transmission - so being forbidden to sing and play nearly destroyed that tradition.

    Luckily, Estonia became independent again in 1991, and thanks to surviving wax cylinder recordings, a few notated tunes and some lucid memories, the Estonian folk music tradition was pieced back together again and is thriving, stronger and prouder than ever before.

    Hafwen x

    Source(s): I play in an Estonian folk band
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  • Rrr
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    This sort of thing happened quite commonly in the Soviet Union, there were several composers in that era who felt very threatened, artistically, Khachaturian actually considered giving up composing because of the pressure from the government he was under.

    Lots of films by Soviet filmmakers were confiscated and subsequently destroyed. Eisenstein comes to mind.

    Hope this helps.

    EDIT: I came across this on Wikipedia and was reminded of this question:

    The Guinness Book of World Records lists Telemann as the most prolific composer of all time with more than 800 credited works. More recent studies, for example the thematic catalogues of his works published in the 1980s and 1990s, have shown that Telemann actually wrote over 3,000 compositions, many of which are now lost. Some of his pieces, thought lost, were recently uncovered by the musicologist Jason Grant. Many of the manuscripts were destroyed during World War II. (Another composer, Simon Sechter, could be considered more prolific, since he is thought to have written over 8000 pieces, but 5000 of these were short fugues.)

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  • 1 decade ago

    check out the web site of Suppressed Music. They are admittedly a bit dry, because it is a site for musicologists and researchers, but they have some pretty impressive results. their task is to reconstruct some of the music from the Nazi time.

    An independent publisher in London, Toccata Press, also publishes biographies of such composers, and is working on CDs or newly rediscovered works by some of these composers. I'm sure these are not the only two sites in the big wide world of music to do this type of reconstruction, so pass it along.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Look at resources regarding Nazi Germany. In addition to burning books during state run "book burnings", they also burned musical manuscripts. And of course, the Nazis repressed many forms of art. Check out your library. Do some historical research.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    YES! The Chinese communists attempted to eradicate all Western classical influence: instruments, records, scores, you name it. It was called I think the dissemination of culture or something like that. A pop culture reference to this is available in the film "The Red Violin" with Samuel L. Jackson - also just an excellent movie to entertainment value. Hey to add to your list of Trgedies, the Alexandrian library being burned???? - one of the first. Also, the genocide of the Native Americans = music, art, dance, you name it.

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  • 4 years ago

    Yeah my parents get mad if I play All That Remains or similar bands. Deathcore is noisiest for me. My friend listens to it and it doesn't sound like music at all to me just random noise and random yelling.

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  • 1 decade ago

    see 2 Live Crew i remember back in the 80s some preacher running over tapes and albums and maybe cds. Also see the Taliban they enjoy destroying enjoyable things

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    When the Beatles said that they were more popular than Jesus people destroyed their albums. My mother threw all mine away and would not let any be brought into our home and she would not allow me to listen to them. I am 56 now and I have their whole collection!!!

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    no

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I'm fine and how are you?

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