Pauper's Oath Contested....help!?

I filed for divorce in Harris County, (Houston) TX with a pauper's oath of inability to pay court costs. I recieved a notice to go to court for a hearing on the contest. Is this standard? It says I need to show strict proof. Does that mean bring bills/statements. etc? Or does getting this mean, that basically I need to pay the filing fees?

Is there a guideline for income above which these sorts of requests are denied?

Technically, I make over 3700 a month as a teacher, but only actually bring home just 2,000 after taxes, deductions....

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Uh... go to the court and tell a judge this, not us.

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  • lopato
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Paupers Oath

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  • 4 years ago

    It's an oath where someone declares they are completely destitute (or are in fact a pauper). I don't believe it is commonplace today but with the looming world recession... Prisoners often take it but many people made the oath during the Great Depression as it was (is) a pre-req for gaining benefits, services or a particular status. Basically it's an affidavit for a legal purpose.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Puaper's oath is based on your income, and you're far from a pauper. The other person is right, you will irritate the judge, and he will deny it. I stood behind a person who made $8/ hr (in TX) who was ordered to pay their own fees.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Definition of pauper is a person destitute of means except such as are derived from charity ; specifically : one who receives aid from funds designated for the poor or a very poor person. I do not thing that Court will find you unable to pay filling fee and you may also irritate judge which is bad idea.

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