What do you think about this here League of the United Latin American Citizens border may be illegitimate?

CASEY WIAN, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): The United States/Mexico border was established in 1848 by the Treaty of Guadeloupe Hidalgo which ended the Mexican/American war and the Gadsden Purchase in 1854. A century and a half later the California chapter of the League of the United Latin American Citizens is... show more CASEY WIAN, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): The United States/Mexico border was established in 1848 by the Treaty of Guadeloupe Hidalgo which ended the Mexican/American war and the Gadsden Purchase in 1854.

A century and a half later the California chapter of the League of the United Latin American Citizens is questioning the very legitimacy of the order, as part of their effort to secure amnesty for illegal aliens following President Obama's recent trip to Mexico.

BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: My country has been greatly enriched by migration from Mexico. Mexican-Americans form a critical and enduring link between our nations. And I am committed to fixing our broken immigration system.

WIAN: LULAC claims that 2008 Supreme Court decision in a Texas death penalty case involving a Mexican citizen could render the 1848 border treaty invalid because Congress failed to make the treaty binding on individual states.

So its California director says, "The government of Mexico should exercise its rights to third-party arbitration and reopen all questions of immigration including the rights of Mexican citizens in the United States and the legitimacy of the border itself."

The group says Mexicans in the United States were treated unfairly after Guadeloupe Hidalgo and should now be given legal status.

JAN TUCKER, LULAC, CALIFORNIA CHAPTER: Mexico didn't get what it bargained for in giving up its land, then why should it be bound by that border? And even if we're not going to revisit the issue of the border per se, shouldn't Mexico have a right to a third party examination?

WIAN: California LULAC suggests Canada, Brazil, Great Britain or France could help renegotiate the border treaty.

LULAC's national office did not respond to requests for comment on its California chapter statement which also criticized the Obama administration's appointment of Allen Bornstein as border czar. He's a former San Diego U.S. attorney credited with cracking down on illegal immigration during the 1990s.

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WIAN: We spoke with Santa Clara University law professor David Sloss who's written extensively on the Medellin versus Texas Supreme Court decision. He called LULAC's claim that the border is illegitimate, quote, "pretty absurd."

However, Sloss says there is the small possibility that a small number of descendants of Mexicans living in the southwest in 1848 could have a claim to U.S. citizenship, Lou.

DOBBS: All right. And one would hope that they are already citizens.

We appreciate it. Thank you, Casey. Another bizarre part of what is often a very messy issue, illegal immigration, border security. You would think it should be so straightforward, wouldn't you?
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