How you appear in the virtual world could affect your behavior in real life?

How you appear in the virtual world could affect your behavior in real life, according to researchers at Stanford University. Andrea Seabrook speaks with Stanford's Jeremy Bailenson about his research into how people interact psychologically with their virtual-reality representations.

Listen to this interview, I am curious about your thoughts

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?story...

Update:

Know It All, for your disappointment, I have never given you thumbs down, or called anyone for that objective. It seems it is always you the one that snaps at me at any occasion. I don't even know who you are or care about you.

Mad: Thanks for your answer :-)

Others: if you don't like my question or the way it was formulated, don't answer, as simple as that.

Update 2:

Sorry all for some of my additional details, the people I was referring to, deleted their answers.

9 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I can't hear the interview. :-( But do agree that some people play roles online, then in reality adapt to these personas they would like to be. Perhaps as a way to cope with their reality? I don't know, but human behaviour and thinking interest me.

    This reminds me of when children start to develop different traits to cope with serious issues they are experiencing, not that I associate people who take their online personas into reality as children, but the coping mechanisms.

    If people are so dissatisfied with themselves, that they develop different identities and these start to interfere with their lives, it could become very mentally unstable.

    You might see a reflection of that in some people here.

    Interesting q, I wonder what folks in psychology would say about this. :-)

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I've found the only difference between who i am online and who i am in the real world is that online i have more time to be articulate.....You can take time to find words and you can delete things you think coulda been explained in a more effective way. As far as personality goes tho, what you see is what you get :)

  • 1 decade ago

    My real-life behaviour comes before my virtual behaviour; I don't feel a need to put on an act on the Internet.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    yeah! they say it's like an atler ego like playing games like world of warcraft or what not as you get to build this person who you want to be but can't be in life so it brings out the"acting" phase where people want to be like their on line life...

    sorry couldn't open the link (work firewall iguess)

    but there was a study done like this and with D&D

    anyway have a good day!

    Guessing i'll get 3 td for this post!

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I know about virtual life web sites but I don't visit them. I need real people to interact with.

    Source(s): Aging hippie
  • 1 decade ago

    I've tried being an alternate version of myself online. I can never pull it off. I lose interest in the other version and end up reverting back to the regular me.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Only for the weak minded. I think your interactions on the net has more effect on you than your avatar. My intent of my avatar may be different than how people perceived my avatar.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    /\

    I

    I

    LMAO That's the most truthful thing I've ever heard about GWS users.

    Oh dear.

    I'm going to dissappear in to the shadow world.

    I only have a shot with fellow unnattractive shadows.

  • 1 decade ago

    Thank you for the link, my friend!! :)

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