What is the relationship between voltage and current for a resistor?

i need help to describe the relationship between voltage and current for resistors. I know that it has something to do with OHMS law, but how would you describe this relationship?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    It's important to understand a few things about electricity in order to get the full picture. You can form a fairly good analogy between water and electricity.

    In terms of doing work, a small amount of water under a huge amount of pressure can do an equivalent amount of work of a huge amount of water under very little pressure.

    The same applies to electricity. In the electrical world, a resistor is like a small pipe -- it manages to lower the current (quantity) of electricity, that can pass, and whatever comes out the other end builds in voltage (pressure) slowly -- if you're actually consuming electricity on the other side, then the voltage may never build at all.

    So, now that that is understood, here is Ohm's law:

    I=V/R

    - The current (I: amount allowed through the resistor) is equal to the voltage (V: the difference in pressure between different sides of the resistor) divided by the resistance value (R: how much the resistor restricts the flow).

    From this, we can deduce a few things... Again imagining this as a water system, we have a water supply (battery) entering an unusually small pipe (resistor), filling a bathtub (an electrical load, say, a lightbulb). The pressure near the water supply is high, but since only a limited amount of water can get through that small pipe, the other side is fairly low pressure -- it just dribbles out into the bathtub. We can calculate exactly how much (current) is flowing through that segment of small pipe (the resistor) by saying this:

    voltage (V - measured in volts) = the pressure of the water supply (high) minus the pressure in the tub (low).

    resistance (R - measured in ohms) = the smallness of the pipe

    current (I - measured in amps) = the amount of water that can pass at any given time, considering the pipe's smaller size.

    Now imagine the two extremes:

    Imagine a really big pipe (zero resistance) -- the pressure will not change between the different ends of the pipe, so the voltage (pressure difference) is zero. Lots and lots of water (current) can flow through this pipe. This kind of circuit is called a "short" -- a wire that directly connects things.

    Or, the alternative, imagine a really small pipe -- say, completely clogged. The flow (current) would be zero -- any pressure on one side will not transfer to the other side. This is called an "open" -- no electrical connection at all.

    Using the following formula to calculate watts (a measurement of total energy), you can see that there is no waste in the above two scenarios. "Shorts", such as wires and lightswitches that are on, and "Opens", such as lightswitches that are off, waste virtually zero energy.

    W=I*V

    In all other cases, some energy is lost in that resistor, and you can use this formula to determine how much.

    If you understood my answer, you should now be able to use algebra to figure out the resistance (R) of a 100-Watt light-bulb when it is plugged into a 120-Volt light socket! Good luck!

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    - Kipp

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  • 4 years ago

    Relationship Between Voltage And Current

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  • buono
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Relation Between Voltage And Current

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    What is the relationship between voltage and current for a resistor?

    i need help to describe the relationship between voltage and current for resistors. I know that it has something to do with OHMS law, but how would you describe this relationship?

    Source(s): relationship voltage current resistor: https://tr.im/a1a6l
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  • 1 decade ago

    Ohm's law applies to electrical circuits; it states that the current through a conductor between two points is directly proportional to the potential difference or voltage across the two points, and inversely proportional to the resistance between them.

    Or simply V = I*R

    Note that Ohm's law apply only to ohmic materials i.e. Materials which obey ohm's law.

    Not all materials follow this V = I*R relationship.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Ohms Law is a law of proportionality that states that it takes 1 volt to push 1 amp through 1 ohm or resistance.Another way to look at it is that the current ( I ) in a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage (E) applied to the circuit and inversely proportional to the resistance (R).

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  • krk
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    R=voltage divided by current.

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  • Mick W
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    resistors in series divide voltage, as in the daisy chain, resistors in parallel divide current, I squared R is the power dissipated in a resistor. does this help?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Ohms law states that in an unvarying resistance, current changes proportionately with voltage.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I=E/R where I is current E is voltage and R resistance.

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