When you put "Payment in Full" on a check, doesn't that signify that you can't be bothered for more money?

I have a friend who is in a situation. She told me that she recently had a problem with yellow pages in regards to posting her business. The "contract" was an oral contract over the phone. For some negligent reasons on the company's part, my friend called and asked to end the contract and what... show more I have a friend who is in a situation. She told me that she recently had a problem with yellow pages in regards to posting her business. The "contract" was an oral contract over the phone. For some negligent reasons on the company's part, my friend called and asked to end the contract and what penalties would follow for doing so. The person on the other end said there would be no penalties as long as she paid for the time that she agreed to (3 months). Even though she was bothered by it, my friend did so and canceled the contract. My friend (did an electronic fund withdrawl) wrote a check with the statement "paid in full" to the left of her "signature". Then, in her checkbook she wrote the balance after she spoke with the representative. A long time passed and they never deducted. I told her to call them up and have them send her a verification that they did take the bill amount from the checking account. She was never able to speak with a representative and let it go. 8 months later, yellowpages sends her a bill for $127.30 saying that collection was not paid and that they had a collection agency that would handle the matter. I've advised her at this point to seek legal advice but would there be any form of measure we can do to avoid an attorney? Common sense tells me they should have sent her a "receipt" to finalize her contract. Are things like over-the-phone contracts more susceptible to loophools that my friend wasn't aware of? Help! I thought when you placed, "paid in full" that if there was any discrepancy, then the company would have intervened in a more timely manner than 8 months.
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