md asked in HealthDiseases & ConditionsDiabetes · 1 decade ago

can anyone with diabetes answer this questions please?

I'm doing an i search so can you answer this questions. and if u answer please leave your name and phone number or email because that's the requirements for an interview.please answer this questions soon as possible

1. What was your first reaction when you found out that you had diabetes?

2. Has your life changed since finding out you have it?

3. What is your typical day like when you have to take insulin?

4. How does it feel having type 1 diabetes?

5. Are you more health conscious now?

6. What actions are you taking as of now to prevent any further bad effects?

7. What are some side effects of medications you take?

8. Has it or will affect your children?

9. What was your diet before found out and what is your diet now?

10. Do you exercise regularly? If so, what type?

11. What medication are most frequently prescribed for diabetes?

12. How often do you test your blood sugar?

13. How can we young people reduce the rick of becoming type 1 diabetic?

14. What are the chances that it will be passed on to the next generation?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    1. What was your first reaction when you found out that you had diabetes? I was 10 years old when dx. My first thought was why did God give this to me. I was mad.

    2. Has your life changed since finding out you have it? In the 32 years of having type 1 diabetes, every year there is something changing. From how exercise and what I eat affects how I feel, to side effects from having diabetes. There were years when things I ate would not digest correctly, I had to drink horrible sugary medicine which helped my stomach but killed my blood sugar levels. When dx, we didn't have blood sugar testing equipment. All results were after the fact, so we were trying new things all the time.

    3. What is your typical day like when you have to take insulin? I have had to take insulin everyday since dx. Typical day today is wake up, check blood sugars, take meds, eat (when I'm not hungry) go to work, make sure I eat my snacks and lunch on time, make sure I'm not working too hard or I have to lower my insulin. (on pump).....and so on. In general having to eat when not hungry is the biggest daily problem.

    4. How does it feel having type 1 diabetes? It sucks, when you get low, you feel like a bowl of jello, not being able to understand or function correctly, missing huge gaps of time. When blood sugars are high, there are headaches, thirsty, and feeling tired.

    5. Are you more health conscious now? What 10 year old is health conscious I don't know, but being raised to eat healthier has always been there. I can remember at about age 13 or 14, rebellion was to eat something I wasn't suppose to have, like twinkies.

    6. What actions are you taking as of now to prevent any further bad effects? See a doctor every month, on a continuous glucose monitor, and on a pump.

    7. What are some side effects of medications you take? large knots where injection sites are and bruising.

    8. Has it or will affect your children? My kids, know when I say I need something to eat to get me juice or something with sugar and to hurry. I have only passed out twice that I can remember, but my kids know when I'm low, things have to wait. (they are 14 and 21 now)

    9. What was your diet before found out and what is your diet now? My mom said I was the kid who didn't want the cakes, pies and stuff, I have always perferred veggies and cheese.

    10. Do you exercise regularly? If so, what type? No my work is exercise enough, I do have to lower my basal rate by 30% while at work.

    11. What medication are most frequently prescribed for diabetes? type one diabetics have to have insulin, there is no choice.

    12. How often do you test your blood sugar? 4 or more times a day even with a CGMS.

    13. How can we young people reduce the rick of becoming type 1 diabetic? Young people don't really get a chance to reduce the risk, type 1 is where your pancrease just quits working, it is mostly genetic.

    14. What are the chances that it will be passed on to the next generation? I was told due to my husband's family history, that my kids had a 5-10% chance. I do tend to watch them more closely than the average parent and when they start acting weird having more thirst or headaches, I check to see what their glucose level is. I also have their A1c's checked every two years.

    Source(s): Life experiences. fiacat@yahoo.com
  • 4 years ago

    1

    Source(s): Two Weeks Diabetes Cure - http://DiabetesCure.raiwi.com/?uhdy
  • 3 years ago

    2

    Source(s): My Diabetes Gone Completely - http://DiabetesGoFar.com/?aJsX
  • 1 decade ago

    1. The words from my mouth would need censored

    2. Cut alot of things from my diet

    3. I take my insulin 3 to 5 times a day, so I wake up take it, eat, take it, eat, take it, and then take it at bed time

    4. it sucks. I've actually gotten in trouble by the police for needles in my vehicle, then had to requesition my medical records and show them to the police dept to have paraphenalia charges dropped.

    5. No more than before. I was alot to begin with

    6. No sugar, no sweets, no soda, no fruit juice

    7. Risk of bottoming out your sugar

    8. Of course, because it runs in the family

    9. Before, lots of freedom, now, too strict

    10. Cant execise, asthma and arthritis

    11. Insulin types N and R, 70/30 and metformin

    12. five times a day

    13. No prevention for type one as it is genetic. Type 2 can onset by weight gain and poor diet

    14. High chances. If one of your parents have diabetes, you have a 25% chance of developing the disease, a 50% chance of passing it to the next generation, and a 25% chance of not being a carrier or diseased. Gotta love genetics.

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  • 3 years ago

    Well, first you have got to detect that historic humans are historic, matters simply do not paintings as good as they used to. Your grandfather getting diabetes variety two at a sophisticated age is not any indication that you've got a genetic vulnerability. Diabetes is whilst your pancreas does no longer produce the insulin that you wish to have, does no longer produce adequate insulin, produces useless insulin or your frame is resistant on your insulin so it is a regulatory hindrance. With vitamin, you'll have smaller extra common foods and curb glycemic index meals which spreads out the carbohydrates through the years. It's like whilst you can not raise a one hundred lb field, you divide it into 2 50 lb containers. Exercise additionally makes use of up one of the most glucose and improves your metabolism. Neither will difference your pancreas, they are able to defer the have an effect on of diabetes or even defer the prognosis of diabetes however they do not quite make a difference, you are simply lifting 50 lb containers alternatively of the one hundred lb field so no longer being ready to raise the one hundred lb field does not subject. Keeping a well degree of endeavor is well however you are over-reacting on your grandfather's diabetes, you quite don't have anything to worry.

  • 4 years ago

    Type 2 diabetes, usually referred to as adult onset, is when your body produces insulin but can not use it properly. This type can be treated successfully with the right diet and exercise in most circumstances. Read here https://tr.im/5yEBx

    If blood sugars are not kept under control at some point insulin will probably be integrated / oral medications are also available. People with diabetes can live long, happy lives but must be diligent in their care and make sure you see your endocrinologist on a regular basis.

  • 4 years ago

    Cure Diabetes Problems Naturally : http://www.DiabetesTreated.com/Always

  • 5 years ago

    My diabetes was discovered by both myself and my family when I was 8 years old; hence I have dealt with diabetes for 4 decades and 2 years, My first reaction when I learned I had this condition was "Wow, I'm glad Halloween is already over". I learned of my diabetes in early December, not yet considering Christmas treats, of course. When I first became diabetic, blood test meters were not yet available, I was forced to pee in a cup and test for pee sugar (which at the time didn't gross me out as much as it now does). No one else in my family had been diagnosed diabetic and although my maternal grandmother was later diagnosed as type II diabetic, that was decades after my own discovery of diabetes. I lost my renal function about 5 years after my college graduation in 1986. 12 years following my kidney transplant, I was blessed with the birth of my healthy and handsome (now 16 year old) son, My son's name is Benjamin and he has shown no signs of diabetes himself (I used to drive the kid nuts by constantly smelling his breath for ketones. after Ben turned fifteen, I stopped doing this, though.

    I do keep Mountain Dew 24 packs in our refrigerator. When I realize through my blood tester that my blood sugar is dangerously low, I drink a half can of the soda followed by either cheese or cheese covered crackers. I watch what I eat more carefully than I did in both elementary,high school and college but my life would be so much easier if I could just know what my blood sugar always is at. I also might probably be able to again have my drivers license returned to me. I allowed my license to be revoked by failing to return the form the state of Kansas sends to me each year (as I had again been hospitalized for an insulin reaction, I knew the state would refuse to allow me to drive.

    Nearly 2 decades ago, I lost the ability to recognize any hypoglycemia. Hence, the first sign of low blood sugar for me is now falling on my head. I remain both coherent and rational during low blood sugars but after I've gotten suddenly sleepy or passed out cold and/or been hospitalized, I hear things from medical staff like "Oh, my! Your blood sugar was only 22!). As CGM's are not yet covered by Medicare, I am very much hoping that some insulin pumps also act as also as a glucose monitor. I use Novolog insulin and take shots before each meal and also when my blood sugar reading exceeds 25O one shot of Novolog at bedtime; the dosage of Novolog is determined by my blood sugar readings; I am on a sliding scale, hence the amount of Novolog I take depends upon my blood sugar.

  • 4 years ago
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