Fighting lung congestion after a CABG (coronary artery bypass grafting)?

My father has undergone a CABG and has been suffering from several post operative challenges. One of the major roadblocks to his recovery now is his inability to cough out the phlem depositing in his lungs. As I see it there are a few reasons for this. First, he is too week to do it. Second, since he had to undergo a sternal rewiring surgery after his CABG he has a mental block that coughing out strongly would impact the sternum again. Finally, he is just down right depressed having passed more than 15 days in critical care units of the hospital.

I look forward to any suggestions that you might have for helping him and motivating him to come out on top of this challenge.

7 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    Hospitalized patient often have diminished respiratory effort and impaired mucociliary clearance of pulmonary secretion.

    A number of factors can contribute to these impairments, including decreased physical activity, pain, altered mental status, and certain medication.

    The goal of bronchial hygiene therapy is to supplement airway mucociliary clearance and optimize pulmonary function.

    The essential components of bronchial hygiene therapy include:

    1-Humidification of the airways

    2-Deep breathing and incentive spirometry

    3-Chest physiotherapy

    4-Noninvasive positive-pressure techniques

    5-Invasive suctioning of the bronchotracheal tree

    But, all of above, is performance of duty of framework nursing, with direct order a doctor.

    Source(s): Miller's anesthesia
  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Fighting lung congestion after a CABG (coronary artery bypass grafting)?

    My father has undergone a CABG and has been suffering from several post operative challenges. One of the major roadblocks to his recovery now is his inability to cough out the phlem depositing in his lungs. As I see it there are a few reasons for this. First, he is too week to do it. Second, since...

    Source(s): fighting lung congestion cabg coronary artery bypass grafting: https://tr.im/BShbY
  • 1 decade ago

    It's normal for your father to be fearful after having to go through not only one, but two surgeries. Don't let him let his fear make him worse. He should have been given both a pillow to hold while coughing and an incentive spirometer, with directions for how to use both and how important it is to use both. Your father should be holding the pillow to his chest as he moves about, especially out of bed or back into bed, or when he turns over in bed. He should hold it to his chest when he coughs, or laughs, or burps or hiccups... Just because he's out of the hospital doesn't mean he gets to stop using his incentive spriometer. I usually tell my patients that that incentive spriometer is his/her best friend in the world, next to family and nursing staff...Tell him to use it: ten individual breaths every hour that goes by while he's awake. Period. No negotiation here. It will improve his lung function. Since I'm not sure of the particulars of your father's case, I can't talk to you about his medications, or fluid intake, or activity level. If he's home, my guess is that he should be able to get up and move around. As a rule, the more the better, until he begins to fatigue. He should be able to pay attention to his own body and respect the fact that he will fatique more easily now, but that is not an excuse not to be moving. Activity will make his lungs work better. As a rule, so will fluids, but without knowing your father's case, I can't recommend that, because too much fluid could also hurt him. He should have been given very clear instructions about activity, incentive spirometry, medications, fluids, etc...before he left the hospital. If anything was unclear, that was the time to ask. But you can still call the surgeon and ask for further clarification now. If your father is really just too afraid to breathe deeply, remind him he can die of post op pneumonia if he doesn't find the way and courage to clear his lungs. Surely he does not want to end up back in the hospital again, because he was afraid to use that spirometer, or to walk or to hold his pillow and cough....! You really have to call his doctor, who is familiar with his case, and get these questions answered. His doctor knows his whole health picture. Here we can only surmise and give you general information, which may or may not help your father.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    having had two heart bypasses I know how your father is feeling .After my first one I had pneumonia and pleurisy because I had continued smoking when told I should stop at least six weeks before the operation.Coughing after a bypass is extremely painful your fathers pain threshold may have been lowered after all he has gone through and the very distressful condition he is in now plus the depression he feels which is felt by very many patients after open heart surgery.I received the help of a physiotherapist with his assistance I soon got rid of the mucus and recovery soon followed

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 1 decade ago

    The nurses there should be able to provide you with some suggestions. They may suggest things like deep breathing exercises, specific medications to losen the secretions, drinking more water (if allowed based on his specific treatments) to losen secretions, controlled coughing exercises, positioning, etc. Talk to the medical professionals working with your father to see what might work best for his situation.

  • 1 decade ago

    post operative complication is postural pneuomania . because patiet has to lie on his back for several days , resulting in deposition of bronchial secreation in lungs resulting cough he is advised to cough out phlegm is one way to remove secreations frm lungs . proper antibiotics and little movement will make him healthy

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.