ec jr. asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 1 decade ago

during the civil war north v.s south did the west coast play any part in the outcome and ifso what was it?

we know north and south was at war on the east coast but we never hear about what was going on the west coast

7 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    "California's involvement in the American Civil War included sending gold east, recruiting or funding a limited number of combat units, maintaining numerous fortifications, and sending troops east, some of whom became famous.

    ...

    The majority of Southern sympathizers in the state made plans to secede with Oregon to form a "Pacific Republic." Their plans rested on the cooperation of General [Albert Sydney] Johnston. Johnston understood this, and met with the men, but he declined. He said he had sworn an oath to defend the Union, and although he believed that Lincoln had violated and destroyed the Constitution holding the Union together, he would not go against his word."

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 4 years ago

    It depends. The civil war was unnecessary and the loss of 100 000 Americans will always be unjustifiable, but constitution-wise the South had every right to secede even though it would have destroyed both the North and the South's economies, and was not the wisest action to take. The North's economy was capitalist and industrialist, whereas the south was more protectionist, communal and agrarian, but capitalism would have spread to the south even if they had successfully seceded. Slavery, like in Britain and the rest of the world, would have died out so a war was not necessary in the abolition of slavery. Not only that, but many abolitionists in the North thought that it was slavery-like trying to prevent states from seceding and and overwhelmingly large number of abolitionists supported the CSA! Personally, I'd take the abolitionists' side, but not the North's side. PS - It was about state's rights, because Lincoln himself said: "If I could save the Union without freeing any slave I would do it, and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone I would also do that. What I do about slavery, and the colored race, I do because I believe it helps to save the Union; and what I forbear, I forbear because I do not believe it would help to save the Union."

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The area west of the Mississippi fell into three broad categories in 1861. On the west coast were the states of California and Oregon, isolated enclaves of American life. California had only recently been added to the Union, as a result of the Mexican War of the 1840s. Along the western bank of the Mississippi were a series of border states, from Minnesota in the north to Louisiana in the south, which with Texas contained the bulk of the trans-Mississippi population. Between them was a vast third area of unsettled land, stretching from the Mississippi to the Rocky Mountains, which included vast areas conquered from Mexico and large areas of ‘Indian Country’, where the original inhabitants of North America still maintained a precarious independence. Dotted across the map were tiny areas of American settlement, most famous of which was the Mormon settlement of Salt Lake City.

    The Civil War in this vast area also falls into three rough categories. The most important of these concerns the Union campaigns along the Mississippi herself. When these campaigns ended in success, the western Confederacy was cut off, and forced to survive on its own resources. These campaigns have been dealt with already. The second category contains Union attempts to invade the three Confederate states west of the Mississippi – Arkansas, Louisiana and Texas. These campaigns were to have limited success. The western Confederacy was the last area to surrender in 1865. Finally, in the first years of the war the Confederacy cast its eyes west, into New Mexico, Arizona, southern California and northern Mexico.

    More at the link!

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Minimal; California really only supplied gold and the units they allegedly recruited that other's cite were actually raised in eastern cities like Philadelphia and New York. The other territories really did not play a role although some minor skirmishes took place in New Mexico.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 1 decade ago

    General Albert Sydney Johnson was considered the South's premiere soldier ahead of Robert E Lee until his death at Pittsburgh Landing (Shiloh) on April 5 1862.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    The American Civil War (1861-1865). California was aligned with the North States and was Union.

    From Wiki:

    "California's involvement in the American Civil War included sending gold east, recruiting or funding a limited number of combat units, maintaining numerous fortifications, and sending troops east."

    "Eighty-eight violent incidents of various sizes were fought in California, many of them against outlaws trying to capture gold for their own benefit. (No captured gold was sent to the Confederacy.) "

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_in_the_Ame...

    Hope this helps.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Here I got Men of War for free: http://bitly.com/Y2PeMw

    it's a perfectly working link, no scam !

    All the action and strategy of the Second World War returns with a new title in the Men Of War series, and we have it available for you.

    It's a really nice game.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.