cleaning up oil paints ?

are there any good ways to clean oil paint out of my brushes and off of surfaces?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Ordinary liquid soap, even dish soap, and water will clean wet oil paint from brushes and surfaces. If the paint is dry, it can be removed with "Master's Brush Cleaner." It is available at any arts and crafts store, such as Michaels, or online at Dick Blick at http://www.dickblick.com/products/masters-brush-cl...

    Turpentine and similar spirits are dangerous to breathe in. They can cause chemical burns on the skin and will shorten the life of your brushes.

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  • 4 years ago

    Oil paint will not come off with just water. You need to soak your brushes in paint remover or turpentine made special for removing oil based paints. When the paint is all removed then roll up into an old rag and wring the brushes almost dry. Now put into another container like a plastic throw away cup with a little turpentine again and do the same thing to make sure the brushes are totally cleaned from any remaining paint. Wrap again into an old rag or paper towels and wring the bristles out again. This will make and keep the paint brushes ready to use again for oil painting. I always take a nice piece of white paper and wrap it around the brush and put a piece of scotch tape around to hold the paper in place. I do this to store the brushes when not in use and it keeps them clean and perfect condition free from dust.

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  • Zetsu
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Any artist quallity thinner will work for either brushes or surfaces. You could try sansodor, a low odor thinner made by winsor&newton, or turpenoid, a odorless oil paint thinner. To clean them, just pour it in a cup and scurb the brushes vigorously at the bottom, then dry. For a surface, soak a small paper towl with a tinsy bit of your thinner and rub on the surfaces with oil paint.

    Please do not use hardware store solevents. These solevents are for industrial use only and are too powerful for cleaning brushes.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I used white spirit or turps, but if this is not successful, I used wire wool as gently as possible on brushes and on hard surfaces.

    I used to use ordinary oil paints but did not like the smell and the mess, but now use water soluble oil paints and all those bits that I spill on my carpets just wipe out easily with water, and my brushes clean well in water mixed with washing up liquid.

    This has increased my pleasure in painting hugely! Yes, the water soluble oils cost more, but you don't need to buy white spirit etc, and you can enjoy painting without the nausea caused by white spirit.

    Cleaning the sink is much easier as well!

    Best of luck with your painting, Jessie.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I use baby oil, linseed oil, or liquin. I also use B&J brush cleaner. I don't like using turpentine because it's harsh in comparison.. : /

    I never use turpentine, acetone, any of that stuff for painting. Just linseed oil.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Turpentine

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Use turpentine.

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