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What does the purple cloth on the cross mean?

Every year around Good Friday and Easter I notice purple cloth draped on crosses outside of churches. What is the significance of the cloth and also the purple. I know that around Easter churches sometime perform passion plays. Does the purple denote "passion" or something else? Only genuine, knowledgeable replies, Please.

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Purple is the colour of royalty. Roman senators had a purple border on their togas when they sat in the senate house. Kings in the middle east in biblical times wore purple robes and painted their rooms purple. Purple was a colour denied to the masses.

    The cloth is called a Pall. It is what is draped over a coffin, and an item of clothing that a priest wears when officiating at a funeral.

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

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    RE:

    What does the purple cloth on the cross mean?

    Every year around Good Friday and Easter I notice purple cloth draped on crosses outside of churches. What is the significance of the cloth and also the purple. I know that around Easter churches sometime perform passion plays. Does the purple denote "passion" or something else? Only...

    Source(s): purple cloth cross mean: https://tr.im/JWvaa
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  • Sonje
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Violet is the color of Lent in the standard Roman usage. When purple is the color used in Advent, it is desirable, if possible, to use a different, paler shade for Lent, tending towards gray. Advent and Lenten vestments can also be distinguished by the colors used in orphreys and bandings, and by any symbols that might be applied to the vestments. On the right is a detail of a violet vestment with a crown of thorns orphrey which might be preferred for Lent. Lenten white, a natural or off-white hue the color of unbleached linen, is the usual color of Lent in the traditional English use. Sometimes the color is identified as ash, suggesting gray, rather than white. Either is appropriate, as long as the appearance is drab and the effect somber. Absolutely plain vestments and hangings can be very effective, but the traditional Lenten array is often trimmed in black, crimson, or violet. Symbols of the Passion may be painted or sewn on the vestments and hangings. As it is the visual effect rather than any inherent quality of the colors themselves, other colors might also be considered for the Lenten array. For example, depending on the color scheme of the church building and the permanent appointments, some shades of brown, trimmed in crimson or black might also serve the purpose very well.The color rose is one of the subsidiary colors of the Roman use. It is appointed for just two days of the year, the middle Sundays of Advent and Lent, when it replaces purple or violet and signifies the half-way point in these penitential seasons and a mild relaxation of the preparatory fast. The middle Sunday of Advent is called Gaudete ("Rejoice") Sunday, and the middle Sunday of Lent has a similar name Laetere (also meaning "Rejoice"), names taken from the first word of the proper Latin Introit of the day. Today, the use of rose vestments is becoming rare and is most likely to be found in Anglo-Catholic parishes that maintain the Roman color sequence.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Purple was a sign of royalty in olden days. It was a long, difficult, expensive process to make purple cloth so only royalty or the very rich could afford it. There were even specialists at making purple dye, they were called Purplers and in Catholocism they even have a patron saint.

    Jesus was called "King of the Jews" so perhaps that was an adoption oof the mantle of royalty in reference to him.

    "Colours associated with Lent are primarily purple and violet, which are the Western liturgical colours symbolising the suffering of Jesus prior to crucifixion and the suffering of humanity and the world. They are also the colours of royalty, symbolising the coming Resurrection on Easter Sunday."

    • www.smithsonianmag.com/ist/?next=/smart-news/in-ancient-rome-purple-dye-was-made-from-snails-1239931/

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  • 1 decade ago

    During Jesus' mock trial, they put a kingly robe on Jesus and made fun of Him. They put a "crown" [of thorns] on His head.

    The purple cloth is like what would have been on the kingly robe that they put on Jesus for a while. Even though they meant it in a mocking manner, it symbolizes Jesus as our King.

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  • 4 years ago

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  • 1 decade ago

    Purple is a sign of royalty. Christ was called "King of the Jews" but he was also King of Kings.

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  • Pashur
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Purple means royalty or majestic.

    God bless.

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  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    1

    Source(s): Learn Woodworking http://WoodworkingProjects.enle.info/?23zF
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  • 1 decade ago

    Purple signifies repentance, which is why it is used during Lent.

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