Is alliteration a good writing style?

I'm writing a novel and I'm noticing a lot of alliterations (they come naturally). If I were to, say, try and get this published, would publishers look down upon said alliteration?

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  • Dan M
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Alliteration is a powerful tool, used sparingly and in the right way. Certainly you don't want to sound like a comic book, recounting the raucous rows of right and wrong that ring readily round, or whatever. That gets old REALLY quick. But you might consider some of the following ideas:

    "He cracked rusty caps and fractured glass as he crunched through the gravel..." This concept conveys the sound of the event it's describing - the sound of glass and gravel under foot - without having to write actual sound effects.

    It is a common tool as well to use alliteration in names, such as the classic Morkoth, Mordor, Sauron, etc., as well as the more valiant sounding Arwen, Aragorn, Galadriel, Elrond, etc.

    Finally, don't forget to include assonance (like alliteration for vowels) in your mix, to produce more fruitful results:

    "A cream dove cooed musically in the sussurous gusts of dawn."

    This is a blend of "k" sounds, as from a dove, but softened by "S's" and the schwa vowels and "u" sounds. It is a little more reminscent of the scene than...

    "A white songbird made chirping noises as wind blew while the sun came up."

    That's not only more of a report, but the sounds of the words clash with the beauty of the ideas. But, hey...that may sometimes be the effect your looking for, as in the irony of something beautiful clashing with a hangover, for example.

    Just remember that the purpose of assonance, alliteration, and meter/prosody are intended to give writing a lyrical, poetic quality, rather than making them cartoonish.

    Good luck!

  • 3 years ago

    Good Alliterations

  • 4 years ago

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    RE:

    Is alliteration a good writing style?

    I'm writing a novel and I'm noticing a lot of alliterations (they come naturally). If I were to, say, try and get this published, would publishers look down upon said alliteration?

    Source(s): alliteration good writing style: https://shortly.im/Mq48v
  • 1 decade ago

    If you're using alliteration all the time, then chances are, it is going to become irritating and will distract the reader from the story. Publishers may look down upon the alliteration.

    I would strongly advise you to show your writing to the other members of your writing group (if you have one) or your English teacher (if you are still at school). They will be able to assess the work honestly and on its merit. What I can tell you is only theory and comes from not having read the work, or a small section of.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Alliteration is a mind-game and it bores most readers.

    A LITTLE alliteration can work, if it enhances the impact of what is written or creates a useful concatenation of sound.

    But the longer you drag it out, the worse it gets for readers.

    The clunky coblestone-clattering of hooves might be okay, but no more than that!

  • Annis
    Lv 5
    3 years ago

    Hope this helps!

    Source(s): DigitalEssay.net
  • 1 decade ago

    Hmm, good question, I do that a lot too. Like how often are we talking? The occasional one is fine, but if there is more than one in each paragraph I like to break out the thesaurus.

  • chorle
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    It works well for advertising because Picky people pick Peter Pan peanut butter it's the peanut butter picky people pick

  • 5 years ago

    no haha lol

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