How to kill aphids and keep them from coming back?

I have a recurring infestation of aphids on 2 chrysanthemum plants. They are in a window box, but the little buggers still manage to find them.

Last time I used a recipe I found online, mixing olive oil with dish soap and water. The mixture killed the aphids but also turned a number of leaves brown, necessitating a severe cutting-back.

Now that the plants are finally filling out and looking lush and healthy, here come the aphids again. I am looking for a 2 part solution here.

I need to

1. Kill the aphids without harming the plant

2. Discourage them from coming back.

Help!

13 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I use a recipe for soap spray that doesn't damage plants and Definitely kills any bug. 1quart hot water, 6 drops tobasco, 5 drops of dawn, 1 tsp veg. oil mix well in spray botlle and let cool completely. The trick to using this is to 1-make sure the plant is watered well for at least 12 hours prior to application. If not the plant will absorb the chemicals and be harmed or it could burn the foliage. 2-Briskly spray the little bastards off the leaves, then wait 10 minutes to let it soak the bugs, 3-then briskly rinse with fresh water to remove the excess spray. Make sure you don't miss any spots under the leaves. P.S. in nature ladybugs prey mainly, almost exclusively on aphids but I have heard that when we order ladybugs in an effort to control aphids, sometimes the whole box of ladybugs have already spawned and are slowly dieing and are therefore not eating anymore. So sometimes you strike out with that method

  • 5 years ago

    As Don mentioned above you may not have success at keeping aphids away if you don't also control the ants that farm them. Ants will take aphid eggs back to their nest to "winter over" then bring them back out onto the plants in the spring. A way to control the ants that I just heard yesterday is to use a little bit of grits - not the instant kind. What I heard was that they will take it into their nests then if it rains (or presumably if you water) the grits expands blocking their nests. I haven't tried it yet so am not certain how well this will work. But there are aphids on the new growth of my seedling crab tree and the ants are extremely busy running back & forth and up & down the stems and trunk so I need to try something. Nothing else has had any effect on the ants.

    As for the aphids, the most recommended way to control aphids is the encouragement of ladybugs and lacewings into your garden. Additionally, I have read that planting garlic or onions near the plants will keep them away since they don't care for the smell.

    This is an excellent source for the control of aphids: http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pes...

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    How to kill aphids and keep them from coming back?

    I have a recurring infestation of aphids on 2 chrysanthemum plants. They are in a window box, but the little buggers still manage to find them.

    Last time I used a recipe I found online, mixing olive oil with dish soap and water. The mixture killed the aphids but also turned a number of leaves...

    Source(s): kill aphids coming back: https://shortly.im/DEbzJ
  • 1 decade ago

    there are ways to eliminate aphids:

    1. physical method

    removing the affected part of the plant (usually the wrinkled parts)

    2. chemical method

    using appropriate contact insecticides to kill them

    using diluted detergent in tap water. be sure that the mixture is not

    strong. usually 100g:10L of water

    3. biological method

    the use of natural enemies such as lady bugs

    (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), hoverfly larvae (Diptera: Syrphidae),

    parasitic wasps, aphid midge larvae, aphid lions, crab spiders

    and lacewings (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    There are fungi that attacks aphids which include Neozygites fresenii, Entomophthora, Beauveria bassiana, Metarhizium anisopliae and entomopathogenic fungi like Lecanicillium lecanii. Aphids brush against the micrscopic spores. These spores stick to the aphid, germinate and penetrate the aphid's skin. The fungus grows in the aphid hemolymph (i.e., the counterpart of blood for aphids). After about 3 days, the aphid dies and the fungus releases more spores into the air. Infected aphids are covered with a woolly mass that progressively grows thicker until the aphid is obscured. Often the visible fungus is not the type of fungus that killed the aphid, but a secondary fungus.

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  • Don
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    You won't have much success keeping aphids from coming back - aphids reproductive cycle can go from young to adult in one week, and they're essentially born pregnant (there are embryos inside of embryos, actually).

    You can control them while they're there, though. Any strong water spray will knock aphids off of a plant, which generally kills them (they almost never find their way back to the plant). You could do that with a spray nozzle in the sink, possibly. Your mixture of oil and soap might have worked better if you'd diluted it more, or used a less toxic soap (without perfumes or colorant - Dr. Bronners used to be one soap recommended for this, and Safers Insecticidal Soap is approved and sold just for this purpose, too).

    There are beneficial insects that control aphids, but 2 chrysanthemum plants might not justify purchasing them. Ladybugs are most well known, but aphid parasites and predators are more effective for long-term control. One source is http://www.naturescontrol.com.

  • rayos
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Killing Aphids

  • 7 years ago

    It's easy to kill those aphids by home insecticide or with chemical, spray jets, pruning.

    you can read further more from this site http://dripworld.com/116-how-get-rid-aphids

  • 6 years ago

    how to mix-liquid soap and water and oil to kill aphids

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    I have aphids ALLLLLL over my mums…. and everything else. Vinegar?

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