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What are my chances of getting accepted to a top engineering graduate school?

I have a BS in Mathematics with a 3.2 GPA from Southern Illinois University, and am a good test taker, so I should be able to get a good GRE score. What are my chances of being accepted to a graduate program at MIT, GA Tech, or University of Illinois?

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  • eri
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Pretty much zero. Grad schools set a minimum GPA of 3.0 to apply (because you need to maintain a 3.0 to stay enrolled) but most expect a 3.5 or higher, even lower-ranked schools. Also, are you sure your math degree qualifies you to enter an engineering program? Did you take the required engineering classes? Simply knowing the math often isn't enough (it wouldn't get you into a physics grad program). Not only will you be competing against students with 4.0s from top schools, many of them will have research experience as well - publications, conference papers, etc. Did you publish anything?

    I had a 3.7 from a top school, publications, tons of research experience, and great GRE scores, and I got turned down from the top physics programs. So did most people - and engineering is about the same.

  • wyland
    Lv 4
    5 years ago

    MIT is ridiculously troublesome to get into. Admission standards for transfers and are Required of All: : intense college Transcript, college Transcript(s), Essay or very own assertion, Standardized attempt rankings, assertion of fantastic status from earlier institutions(s). Lowest grade earned for any direction which would be transferred for credit (on a 4.0 scale): 3.0.

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