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JDW asked in Cars & TransportationAircraft · 1 decade ago

VFR Flight Plan Routing?

A few questions about how to show your routing on a VFR flight plan. Until now my flight plans were very straight forward, direct from one airport to another. My question is I now have flights that I want to make that are not direct. Some examples of what I mean are going around the end of a mountain range instead of over them or following a highway instead of direct for some different scenery. I am wondering how to show this on a flight plan, I am going to fly over airport 1 and then turn and head to airport 2 without stopping at airport 1. How do I show that I am going to 2 Via 1. The same goes for a VOR or NDB that I might track to and then turn to my destination, can I use these on a VFR flight plan?? I have looked all through my books and can't seem to get much help on this. I have looked for some examples on the internet as well with no luck.

Thanks

7 Answers

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  • Mark
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Use VOR radial and distance for points that aren't named fixes.

    Use latitude and longitude for points that aren't named fixes.

    Give the airport identifier or name for airports you are going to fly over, if they define the route.

    When helpful, use plain language to describe the (highway, railroad, etc.) route.

    In the US:

    On the route portion of the flight plan, if you are flying direct to the first fix you don't say so (with "Direct," "DIR," "DCT," or D->) --you just begin listing the routing with that first fix. If you are going direct between fixes you don't say anything--you just list the fixes. If you are going from your last enroute fix direct to the airport you don't say anything--you just show that last enroute fix last. In those cases the route is direct. (A filed IFR flight plan route does not sound like the full route clearance; in the clearance the word "direct" is used for those direct segments).

    Source(s): www.faa.gov Airports US "Aeronautical Information Manual" 5-1: VFR flight plan, IFR flight plan, and direct flights.
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  • 4 years ago

    Vfr Flight Plan

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  • 4 years ago

    Vfr Direct

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  • 1 decade ago

    You can use any feature, rock, town or whatever's on the chart if you're going to file a VFR flight plan.

    Example: Airport X, whatever town, fish lake, jone's mtn. following the wet river to airport B. You could even include the mag course between the named checkpoints if you want. I've filed like that in the past and they've accepted it.

    All the VFR flight plan does is ensure that when you go missing, they'll know where to start looking for you. Your route of flight listed is giving them a clue. That's really the only function of a VFR flight plan.

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  • Jason
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    If you have access to IFR charts you may be in luck.

    Recently, these have begun to include RNAV style waypoints that the FAA computer system can recognize. They have very strange names like KO81B or LV49C. There is a naming convention that goes with them, but it is not important. What IS important right now is that these waypoints are laid out in a grid pattern and cover the entire US National Airspace System. You can simply file VFR from KABC ./. KO84B ./. LV49C ./. KXYZ ( ./. is international shorthand for Direct To). These waypoints are not depicted on VFR charts, and typically only show on high altitude IFR enroute charts where RNAV Direct navigation is more common.

    These can be purchased at your flight school. Find your route and there may potentially be RNAV waypoints very close to the VFR waypoints you are trying to navigate to and from. Simply file these as your route. Because you are VFR there is no requirement to navigate perfectly between them, this simply gives search and rescue teams a better idea of where to look for you if you don't show up at your destination.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Yes you can use airports, VORs and NDBs as turning points on a flight plan. Each point can be called a waypoint or fix.

    First you enter the departure airport in the appropriate box. Then in the route box enter the waypoints in order. Then enter the destination in the appropriate box.

    Example of VOR route:

    A flight from Regina to Winnipeg.

    Departure airport: CYQR

    Route: DCT YDR YBR DCT

    or DCT YDR V304 YBR DCT (tracking an airway)

    Destination airport: CYWG

    DCT means Direct.

    Example of over flying airports route:

    A flight from Regina to Winnipeg.

    Departure airport: CYQR

    Route: DCT CJV9 CJR8 CKR4 DCT

    Destination airport: CYWG

    You can combine them in any way. You can also use small cities or small lakes as waypoints. Just enter their names. In addition you can use PBD (point bearing distance). For example YDR050R/56DME which means the YDR VOR 050 degree radial 56 miles DME.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    If you're talking about the Flight Service flight plan, show your departure and destinations like normal and in the route of flight put the turn point(s). For FSS to know what you're talking about, you might need to figure out a VOR radial/DME if using a visual landmark so they'll know where to look if you go down.

    For the navlogs, use the turn points as your normal checkpoints but this time you'll need to calculate a new heading, groundspeed, and possibly a new altitude on that line.

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