Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesGenealogy · 1 decade ago

Cherokee-Blackfoot Indian? Everyone tells me it's not possible?

My question is more to get a little background on my heritage. My gramma on my moms side was full blooded Cherokee Indian. My grandpa on my moms side was full blooded Blackfoot Indian. I recently tried to find out if i could join either of the tribes and alot of the information I was getting was saying that my "mix" of blood couldnt happen. I know for a fact that both of my grandparents were those 2 different kinds of american indian because they are both registered members of their tribe. Does anyone know of anyway I can physically prove this? Is that a website I can go to and find their names? My father was full blooded Italian so I look more italian than anything. I have been on many different reservations for missions trips and the elders all tell me I look like a white girl but I have the spirit of an Indian lol Any help would be great. I was adopted right after I was born so I have a limited amount of information on my family history. The information I do have was given by my birth mother to my parents so I would at least know so of my history

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  • 1 decade ago
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    I think you're running into this issue:

    There are MANY MANY MANY people who claim Cherokee-Blackfoot or Blackfoot Cherokee. These people are not enrolled in any Cherokee tribe nor are they enrolled in any Blackfoot tribe. These people's ancestors were never enrolled. The only thing these people have is a story about a C-B or B-C ancestor, no proof, just "gramma said." The whole C-B/B-C thing is unauthenticated: There has NEVER been a documented C-B or B-C tribe EVER. There are however people who are trying to figure out why-oh-why so many people claim to be C-B and B-C. They've come up with their own ideas, none of which have ever been proven. See: http://www.saponitown.com/

    Now, that being said, if you have two ancestors, one Cherokee and one Blackfoot, each enrolled in their respective tribe, and those two lines ended up mixing along the way, eventually producing you, then yes, you can be C-B or B-C. It can happen. You get proof by contacting the tribe where they were enrolled. The tribe keeps track of their enrolled members/citizens. So, contact the specific Cherokee tribe (there are 3 federally recognized Cherokee tribes) where your ancestor was enrolled and get their enrollment information. Contact the exact Blackfoot tribe (only one in the US -- Montana -- and the others are in Canada) where your ancestor was enrolled and get the enrollment information. Only the tribe itself can verify whether or not a person was one of their own. Once they do, there's your proof.

    As far as you enrolling goes, assuming your ancestor was enrolled, you'd have to meet the tribe's enrollment requirements. Since the enrollment requirements for each tribe varies, the actual requirements will depend on which Cherokee or Blackfoot tribe your ancestor was enrolled in since you can only be enrolled in a tribe in which your ancestor was enrolled. You may have to meet minimum blood quantum requirements, residency requirements or other requirements. Again, it's all up to the tribe what requirements you'll have to meet.

    Here are a few more sites on C-B and B-C:

    http://www.darkfiber.com/blackfootcherokee/

    http://www.native-languages.org/iaq18.htm

    http://www.powwows.com/gathering/native-issues/328...

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  • 3 years ago

    Blackfoot Indians History

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Cherokee-Blackfoot Indian? Everyone tells me it's not possible?

    My question is more to get a little background on my heritage. My gramma on my moms side was full blooded Cherokee Indian. My grandpa on my moms side was full blooded Blackfoot Indian. I recently tried to find out if i could join either of the tribes and alot of the information I was getting was...

    Source(s): cherokee blackfoot indian tells 39 possible: https://shortly.im/p2ply
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  • Lisa
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/axENl

    Here is the straightest answer you will get and more than likely it will be thumbed down by others or you won't like it but: "Cherokee-Blackfoot" is normally an indicator of what is called an Indian blood myth. These stories usually indicate that you have African ancestry or Indian-Black mixture of uncertain tribal affilation or degree (and veracity). These were stories that people claimed to diminish African-White admixture or when an ancestor was trying to "pass" for white back in the day. This is the reality. Yet, because these stories got passed down in families and they were meant to kind of hide true ancestry, modern descendants take them as absolute truth (e.g .that they ARE Indian). There was no interaction between the Blackfeet (of Montana) or the Blackfoot (of Norther Plains, West Central Canada) and the Cherokee. These stories probably got their start as a sort of euphemism ("Black" became "Blackfeet"). The references to this tribal "affiliation" correspond with the dime novels of the late 1800s talking about the Blackfeet/foot tribe out west. The Cherokee were often claimed because they were well known and well regarded (since they were the most "advance" tribe according to White perception back in the day). There were no intact Cherokee communities in E. TN after 1839. Just a few scattered families that were of mixed blood and married back into White community after that point. After the 1840s there were only two locations where heavy Cherokee blood was passed along - Oklahoma and Qualla Boundary in North Carolina. We are talking more than 160 years here. Yet, while it is quite common to hear both White and Black people claim to be "Cherokee" it is very UNCOMMON to hear White people claim to be part Black. Many of these claims of "Indian blood" are actually covering for Black-White mixture. And for Cherokee-Blackfoot claims, these are normally found in African American families or White families that don't really know much about their African heritage. Of course, when you point this out people will say "why would my family lie." So, instead they just believe the myth of Indian blood and refuse to use healthy skepticism and learn about the historical context of Cherokee Removal and American race relations.

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  • 1 decade ago

    yes, no and maybe.

    My understanding of being eligible to be enrolled is that you must use PAPER documentation (not dna testing), which proves your connection to a prior enrolled member. I believe anyone with an adoption is going to show the adoptive parents, which would halt the process right there.

    That is for enrolling.

    As for knowing your history, that is not the same thing at all, and info that was given to you, is the key. As long as the grandparents are not living, then you can access records ie census, so forth that will give you more data, and verify what you were given.

    Are you aware of, or in contact with ANY relatives from that side who are still living? If they are not blocked, and your statement of the grandparents being enrolled is accurate..they should be able to get confirmation of that from the tribe.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I do not know how to prove any of it, but I will say that it DOES happen. I do not know what amount I am of either, but I have (according to my mom) both Cherokee and Blackfoot Indian in my blood. And I don't know how people can say that that mixture isn't possible. Isn't any mixture of two humans of the opposite sex possible to create a lifeform? Good luck with your search for an answer.

    • Quamyre2 years agoReport

      I am also of Cherokee-Blackfoot decent and it’s proven in my DNA test from ancestry

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  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    I m a Cherokee.. From my Mothers side.. My Dad told me there was Blackfoot in the family some where down the line... one of his Uncles told him about it... So its in there some where.. but no one ever took the time to try to figure it out my dad said... My Mom was half Cherokee from her Dad.. He was full blooded Cherokee..

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  • 5 years ago

    Just because you or your ancestors are not registered for one the Native American tribes, it doesn't mean that you are not a descendant of Native American. The biggest misconception is, they were all red-skinned. Much archaeological evidence shows that they were originally dark-skinned and spoke Hebrew.. Yes.. They are true Israelites.. Pyramids were also found in Illinois, USA and stones with Hebrew writing in Bat Creek, TN.

    Most Native Americans with substantia Native American genectics l would not join a reservation, because it isolates them and segregates them from others and they don't feel the need to validate their heritage.

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  • Tribes have their own "rules" about lineage. I don't know about yours but imagine this:

    Suppose Cherokee traces your bloodline patri-lineally and Blackfoot does it matri-lineally. If that's the case, neither of them will consider you part of the tribe.

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  • 4 years ago

    It's a shame that the frontiersmen neglected to notify the fathers of our fathers about enrollment. Except for those, who read this article, our people appear to be at a disadvantage. If only God had tattooed it, on our bodies, in an obvious place, we would not find ourselves so unaffiliated. Sorry about the lack of proof... You white guys killed the people who could have given us the means to provide it. Go to hell, and thank the devil, that he gave you a place for your spirit to journey to.

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