Shma
Lv 4
Shma asked in PetsDogs · 1 decade ago

What are some breeds of agressive dogs that you know?

I already have a dog, but I was just watching a TV show and it said that some breeds are more costly to insure because of their aggressiveness. They gave examples like pit bulls, rottweiler, and huskies! I did not believe that huskies were aggressive! I thought about it, and I guess that husky dogs could be closely related to wolves.. but still.. I have never met a husky that will not come right up to you like a lab and beg to be petted.

Update:

I know that lots of dogs are nto exactly agressive... But are just products of their enviorment

Update 2:

Ya.. Sorry about naming dog breeds, but I have never met any of those breeds, my dad is afraid of dogs that have a bad reputaion.... I think they are cute.

19 Answers

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  • Alysa
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I think a dog that hasn't had the right socialization with other dogs or humans are aggressive. The dog that doesn't know anything but to defend it's self is aggressive. It's a shame that Pitt bulls and other awsome breeds are on the list but people are not responsible! I don't think it's cute when I see a Pom barking at me or trying to launch! It's not acceptable.

    As far as huskies go, I own one. I have had him since he was 8 weeks and he is now 3 yrs old. Yes, I have seen him get defensive at the dog park when another dog tries to mount him. Other than that he's the most gentle dog and loves children. They are far from aggressive. If a stranger walked into my home Dakota would walk right up to him and technically say "Hi, my name is Dakota! Give me love!!". Every owner should know that THEY are the only person that knows your dog and their body language. You know when they are being aggressive or just playing. No one should ever tell you different.

  • 1 decade ago

    Aggression can be confused with protectiveness or self defence.

    If we think of aggression as meaning taking the initiative to attack and/or bite people or dogs without reasonable provocation, you can of course get aggressive dogs in any breed.

    But I don't agree with some of the other answers. It is not just how they are raised - some breeds and some lines are more likely to be aggressive.

    Think about it - if most people who bred labradors selected who to breed from based on them being dominate, brave, having a real fighting instinct, an instinct to bite/attack and basically being aggressive then over many generations labs would be a more aggressive breed overall.

    That's the reality of several breeds labelled as aggressive. They are more likely to have those instincts because they were fundamental to the development / history of the breed.

    The instincts may be masked by great training/socialisation, and also some lines may have weaker instincts than others so you can usually find many non-aggressive dogs in all breeds

    The problem is that natural instinct may kick in when excitement is high - which is why you hear of 'sweet' dogs suddenly attacking someone. So people need to take extra care with those breeds bred for aggressive pursuits.

    As well as the history of the breed being important, it also depends on the type of people who choose to breed and own them. If a breed becomes fashionable with the 'wrong' people, you can quite quickly end up with lots of aggressive examples.

    Final thought - I see a lot more overtly aggressive small dogs than big dogs because many breeders and owners seem to disregard temperament and training because the dog is small. That's a real problem. Attacks by small dogs don't make the news so often as the damage is not so extreme.

    Unfortunately, insurers use simplistic rules often based on reported incidents in their region.

    Not fair.

    Source(s): Years of dog breeding, owning and running dog training classes.
  • 1 decade ago

    Although it is true in most cases that aggression is due to poor socialization and training, there are breeds of dogs that have been selectively bred to be aggressive. Pit Bulls, Rottweilers, and Huskies are not of those breeds. If those breeds are overly aggressive it's usually due to some underlying health problem, or irresponsible ignorant owners who don't understand the breed.

    Again, there are breeds that are known for their aggressive nature and it has nothing to do with poor training. It's part of what they were bred for. The Fila Brasileiro is the first one that comes to mind. These dogs were bred to guard estates and livestock and aggression is valued in the breed. Aggression (within a tolerable level) exhibited towards judges in the show ring is even accepted and judges are advised not to touch this breed.

  • GOODD
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Chihuahuas, Pomeranians, Miniature Pinschers are some of the most aggressive ones I can think of. Most vicious dog I ever knew was a Golden Retriever.

    Check out Nunu. He was Cesar Millan's most vicious dog so far and he's a Chihuahua.

    The dogs that are more costly to insure are considered Black Listed Breeds and all insurance companies except State Farm will ask ridiculous premiums and outrageous rules (the dog needs to be chained within an 8' perimeter fence) if they don't drop you outright from your policy.

    These dogs are Rotties, Amstaffs, Staffordshire Bull Terriers, Bull Terriers, American Pit Bull Terriers, Cane Corsos, Presa Canario (sp), Huskies, Malamutes, Chow Chows, German Shepherds, Doberman Pinschers and I think Dalmations are also on the list now. The "Top Ten" (since there used to be only 10) are stereotyped as aggressive dogs because the media spotlight landed on them. It was Dobies in the 80s, Rotties in the 90s and Pits have managed to hang onto the spotlight for the rest of the time. Irresponsible ownership makes it into the news. Good dogs of those breeds don't and neither do aggressive Golden Retrievers that attack people.

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  • 1 decade ago

    No dog breed is born agressive, it's how they are raised and the responsibility of their owners to make them what they are.

    As for Siberian Huskies, they are no more wolfy than the family Labrador is...and aggression IS NOT a normal trait of the breed. Siberians are known to be friendly and personable.

    *Wow, less than 5 minutes and 2 TDs. The ignorance about dogs is spreading. There are no naturally more aggressive dogs...why can't people step up and take responsibility? All dogs need training, every dog from the Chi to the Pit Bull has the chance of being aggressive with irresponsible owners. End of story.

    Source(s): 4 Siberian Huskies, 2 Malamute Mixes, Volunteer/Foster home Siberian Husky Rescue.
  • 1 decade ago

    Breeds known for aggression are ones that are used as guardians, such as Fila Brasileiro...(although I'm not sure if 'aggressive' is the proper term, as they are incredibly loyal with their family, even around children. But a trained guard Filia around strangers is an entirely different story)

    But many of the "vicious" dogs are victims of their circumstances

    Most of the breeds listed as banned or restricted are simply not for your average owner. They require firm, experienced hands, someone that knows how to assume the leadership role in the 'pack'.

  • 1 decade ago

    I always think of a Husky than a snarling Wolf haha.. Anyway, i think dogs are like Humans, you can get the most loving person who wouldnt hurt a fly, is as friendly to everyone and everything and than once they're provoked than they can become aggressive due to self defence. I think the same for dogs, you bring a dog up in a great environment but the minute its provoke it acts as self defense hence 'aggressiveness'. You also get people who are bought up really badly and all their life but do bad things like bash people for no reason, break and enter ect ect, same with dogs, treat them badly they'll act badly.

    So, i agree that no breed of dog is aggressive its the owners fault. But i also think that all dogs have an aggressive side as a sign of self defence and when poeple push that barrier with the dog its why they attack. But of course the big breeds and stocky breeds like pits and bulldogs will be deamed 'agressive' due to their over all apperance and ability to disfigure someone! But i think smaller breeds can be just as 'agressive' in the same circumstances.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    All dogs were are not born aggressive or mean, it is what the owner makes of them.

    and the only reason the insurance is so much higher on some breeds is because of uneducated owners of the large breeds, thus more media attention is given to them, so the insurance company hikes the rates up big time.

    I have all my dogs insured and it costs me 120.00 oer year extra on my home owners is all..I have a Min. Schnauzer, Newfoundland and an Akita....now the Akita is on the list of aggressive dogs, but guess what Farmers Ins. does not hike your rates just because a dog is on the list........only if your dog has been reported and has police reports of attacks or bites does it hike your rates......with some insurance companies...

    And most will check to see if the dog under your name has a record...just like a person for driving offenses...

    The list in Texas for insurance on them is as follows

    Pit Bulls

    Rotti

    Dobvermans

    and large or bully breed, but that does not mean your insurance is sky high either,,just shop around and get the best rates...

    and Huskies, Malamutes, are not on the list as risk in Texas....

    good luck

  • 1 decade ago

    they are not aggressive... it's the people who train them to be..... I have a Pit Bull and she has the heart of and Angel..... she is scared of a Yorkie across the street..... is that mean ???? NO !!!!! there are no bad dogs or aggressive dogs.... just bad or abusive owners......

  • 1 decade ago

    i really think a person who has raised 2 or more dogs that bite agressively and have (soured) personalitys,should seriously think about stickin with yorkies or something,insted of just pasing them off and starting over with a new pup.

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