Why is it wrong to say "quicker" in this sentence?

Our pet rabbit Kermit can eat quicker than both of our cats.

But my teacher says it would be "quickly", not "quicker". Why? I think quicker works perfectly fine.

For example ... I can say, "I'm stronger than James" .... would it make sense to say, "I'm strongly than James????"

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    "quick" is an adjective. it modifies a noun. so is "quicker". you used that word as an adverb, describing how fast kermit can eat. so that's wrong. kermit can eat more quickly than the cats. it would be correct to use "quicker" if you used it to modify the length of time it takes him to eat.

    in your example, you can say that you're stronger than james because strong is an adjective, modifying the pronoun i (or i'm).

    hope you understand my explanation.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Your teacher is right. It's simply proper grammar to say more quickly in most cases. Strongly is not correct, it would be I'm more strong than James. Or I'm stronger than James. Just remember, English is a messed up language and it's hard to get all of those rules figured out. It's not just 'quickly' it's more quickly. For example, Our pet rabbit Kermit can eat more quickly than both of our cats.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I don't think it's grammatically incorrect. It just sounds stylistically awkward.

    "Faster" and "more quickly" sound better, due to habit I suppose.

    And in the case of James being stronger, "stronger" is an adjective (describing James). Words such as "strongly", ending with "ly" are always adverbs, so it doesn't make sense there.

    In the first sentence, "quickly", since it's describing the rabbit eating, would be an adverb, therefore it would make sense.

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  • sean C
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    I say it all the time. But then again, I was raised in the south and we like to save time when were speaking. For example, I can get there much quicker than she can... As opposed to, I can get there much more quickly than she can. Your not really saving that much time, but it just seems easier saying it that way.

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  • Ann F
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Cell and Katie are right. It is more quickly.

    When comparing 2 or 3+,

    one syllable-er/est

    3 syllables -more/most

    2 syllables-who knows/both

    Most ly endings are more or most. It is ly because it is an adverb meaning HOW.

    Then, there are the exceptions. It is a craszy language.

    Source(s): I did my best!
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  • 1 decade ago

    Quickly is an adverb, which modifies an action (i.e. eats quickly, ate quickly, etc.) It wouldn't make sense in that part of the sentence.

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  • 1 decade ago

    it's actually more quickly.

    most words that you can add "er" to are properly said by adding "more" to it. Instead of saying "she's richer than us" it would be "she's more rich than us"

    If you're teacher is going to correct you, she needs to explain to you why she did so. Otherwise, she'd be called a "Corrector" and not a "Teacher"...

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  • 1 decade ago

    your teacher's a douch it wouldn't be quickly it should be faster and because some words aren't used like that at all it's american it's confusing trust me just correct your teacher that it should be faster not quickly or quicker but quicker is the best of the two

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  • 1 decade ago

    I agree with you saying quickly in that sentence dosen't sound right

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  • 1 decade ago

    How about using the word: Faster

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