Maddie asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 1 decade ago

were there any laws vitoed while John F Kennedy was in office?

im doing a reseach paper on JFK can u give me any info that isnt obvious.

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    President Kennedy vetoed 21 bills during his time in office: 12 regular and 9 pocket-vetos. None were overturned in Congress.

    All of the information can be found here: http://www.senate.gov/reference/resources/pdf/pres...

    S. 1528.

    To increase the relief or retirement compensation of

    certain former members of the metropolitan Police

    Force, the Fire Department of the District of Columbia,

    the U.S. Park Police Force, the White House

    Police Force, and the US. Secret Service; and of

    widows and children of certain deceased former officers

    and members of such forces, department or service.

    Vetoed September 22, 1961. The veto message was laid

    before the Senate, referred to the Committee on the

    District of Columbia, and printed as S. Doc. No. 58.

    (107 Cong. Rec. 20763~.

    2203 H.R. 3498.

    For the relief of William Joseph Vincent,

    Vetoed May $6 1961. The veto message was laid

    before the House, referred to the Committee on the

    Judiciary, and printed as H.R. Doc. No. 177. (107

    Cong. Rec. 9201).

    2204 H.R. 4206.

    For the relief of Melvin H. Baker and Francis V.

    Baker.

    Vetoed July 20, 1961. The veto message was laid

    before the House, referred to the Committee on the

    Judiciary, and printed as H.R. Doc, No. 214. (107

    Cong. Rec. 13151).

    Eighty-seventh Congress, First Session 445

    H.R. 4640.

    For the relief of the estate of Charles H. Biederman.

    Vetoed September 1, 1961. The veto message was laid

    before the House, referred to the Committee on the

    Judiciary, and printed as H.R. Doc. No. 235. (107

    Cong. Rec. 17892).

    Veto unchallenged

    H.R. 7482.

    To amend the Life Insurance Act of the District of

    Columbia approved June 19,1934, as amended.

    Vetoed September 26, 1961. The veto message was laid

    before the House, referred to the Committee on the

    District of Columbia, and printed as H.R. Doc. No.

    244. (107 Cong. Rec. 21486,21487).

    H.R. 8466.

    To authorize the construction of a railroad siding in

    the vicinity of Taylor Street, Northeast, District of

    Columbia.

    Vetoed September 22, 1961. The veto message was laid

    before the House, referred to the Committee on the

    District of Columbia, and printed as H.R. Doc. No.

    243. (107 Cong. Rec. 20854).

    S. 1459.

    To increase within-grade longevity pay for postal

    workers.

    Pocket veto occurred after the 1st session of the 87th

    Congress had adjourned sine die on September 27,

    1961. The bill was presented to the President on September

    21, 1961. (107 Cong. Rec. 20593, 21413).

    H.R. 8652.

    To grant tax relief for losses sustained by transportation

    companies in converting from street railway to

    bus operations.

    Pocket veto occurred after the 1st session of the 87th

    Congress had adjourned sine die on September 27,

    1961. The bill was presented to the President on September

    25, 1961. (107 Cong. Rec. 21212, 21552, 21553).

    Eighty-seventh Congress, Second Session

    Regular Vetoes

    S. 521.

    For the relief of Charles J. Utterback.

    Vetoed March C 1962. The veto message was laid

    before the Senate, referred to the Committee on the

    Judiciary, and printed as S. Doc. No. 78. (108 Cong.

    Rec. 3598).

    Veto unchallenged.

    S. 1934.

    For the relief of Mrs. Chow Chui Ha.

    Vetoed April 15, 1962. The veto message was laid

    before the Senate, referred to the Committee on the

    Judiciary, and printed as S. Doc. No. 87. (108 Cong.

    Rec. 6638,6639).

    Veto unchallenged.

    S. 3350.

    To amend the act of August 7, 1946, relating to the

    District of Columbia Hospital Center to extend the

    time during which appropriations may be made for

    the purposes of that act.

    Vetoed July S, 1962. The veto message was laid before

    the Senate, referred to the Committee on the District

    of Columbia, and printed as S. Doc. No. 103. (108

    Cong. Rec. 12799,12800).

    Veto u~hallenged.

    H.R. 3372.

    For the relief of Barbara W. Trousil, Edward G.

    Trousil, and Robert E. Trousil.

    Vetoed August 24, 1962. The veto message was laid

    before the House, referred to the Committee on the

    Judiciary, and printed as H.R. DQC. No. 533. (108

    Cong. Rec. 17702).

    Veto unchallenged

    H.R. 7328,

    For the relief of estate of Louis J. Simpson, deceased.

    Vetoed September 20, 1962. The veto message was laid

    before the House, referred to the Committee on the

    Judiciary, and printed as H.R. Doc. No. 559. (108

    Cong. Rec. 20130).

    Veto unchallenged.

    Eghty-seventh Congress, Second Session 447

    Pocket Vetoes

    S. 901.

    To advance the marine sciences, etc.

    Pocket veto occurred after the 2d session of the 87th

    Congress had adjourned sine die on October 13, 1962.

    The bill was presented to the President on October 5,

    1962. (108 Cong. Rec 22562,23474).

    H.R. 1616.

    For the relief of Rickert and Loan, Incorporated.

    Pocket veto occurred after the 2d session of the 87th

    Congress had adjourned sine die on October 13, 1962.

    The bill was presented to the President on October 4,

    1962. (108 Cong. Rec 22685,23544).

    H.R. 3131.

    For the relief of Richard C. Collins.

    Pocket veto occurred &r the 2d session of the 87th

    Congress had adjourned sine die on October 13, 1962.

    The bill was presented to the President on October

    12,1962. (108 Cong. Rec 23423,23545,23546).

    H.R. 4670.

    To amend the law relating to indecent publications

    in the District of Columbia,

    Pocket veto occurred after the 2d session of the 87th

    Congress had adjourned sine die on October 13, 1962.

    The bill was presented to the President on October 8,

    1962. (108 Cong. Rec 22851, 23545).

    H.R. 8938.

    To provide a more definitive tariff classification description

    for lightweight bicycles,

    Pocket veto occurred after the 2d session of the 87th

    Congress had adjourned sine die on October 13, 1962.

    The bill was presented to the President on October

    10,1962. (108 Cong. Rec 23265,23545).

    H.R. 9285.

    For the relief of Mrs. Helenita K. Stephenson.

    Pocket veto occurred after the 2d session of the 87th

    Congress had adjourned sine die on October 13, 1962,

    The bill was presented to the President on October

    12,1962. (108 Cong. Rec 23423, 23546).

    H.R. 12701.

    For the relief of Catalina Properties, Incorporated.

    448 John F. Kennedv

    Pocket veto occurred after the 2d session of the 84th

    Congress had adjourned sine die on October 13, 1962.

    The bill was presented to the President on October 8,

    1962. (108 Cong. Rec 22851,23545).

    Eighty-eighth Congress, First Session'

    Regular Vetoes

    S 1201.

    For the relief of Dr. James T. Maddux.

    Vetoed November 19, 1963. The veto message was laid

    before the Senate, referred to the Committee on the

    Judiciary, and printed as S. Doc. No. 43. (109 Cong.

    Rec. 22400).

    Veto unchallenged

    The first answerer is incorrect on his assertion regarding President G. W. Bush... Bush vetoed 12 laws and had 4 vetos over-ridden. http://www.senate.gov/CRSReports/crs-publish.cfm?p...

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  • James
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    No President since Dwight D. Eisenhower has vetoed fewer than the 21 bills President John F. Kennedy vetoed - that is, until George W. Bush. He has vetoed only one bill despite serving nearly twice as long in office as Kennedy.

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  • Naz F
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    JFK vetoed 24 bills, Bush vetoed MANY, he used to brag about how effective this was, claiming 'the veto works.' He had the chance to veto many bills, since Dems dominated the Congress, and so tried to pass bills that Reps like Bush disagreed with...By 2007, he had vetoed 6 bills.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/latestCrisis/idUSN1...

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  • 1 decade ago

    21 times.

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  • 4 years ago

    LOLOL.. and you have been allowed to vote?????????? Wow... we ask your self what's erroneous with united states of america of america... definite.. he became into in workplace... actually he became into in a automobile on the time of his capturing...LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL.. Gotta love the libbies... J.M.. i'm optimistic they instruct this, yet you're able to desire to pass to college to verify, and not have a ipod on your ear and a cellular telephone on your hand.....LOLOLOL

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