Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction or Sam Mendes' American Beauty?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Pulp Fiction may be the single best film ever made, and quite appropriately it is by one of the most creative directors of all time, Quentin Tarantino. This movie is amazing from the beginning definition of pulp to the end credits and boasts one of the best casts ever assembled with the likes of Bruce Willis, Samuel L. Jackson, John Travolta, Uma Thurman, Harvey Keitel, Tim Roth and Christopher Walken. The dialog is surprisingly humorous for this type of film, and I think that's what has made it so successful. Wrongfully denied the many Oscars it was nominated for, Pulp Fiction is by far the best film of the 90s and no Tarantino film has surpassed the quality of this movie (although Kill Bill came close). As far as I'm concerned this is the top film of all-time and definitely deserves a watch if you haven't seen it.

  • 1 decade ago

    Pulp Fiction

  • 1 decade ago

    :(

    "American Beauty" is in my top 3 movies, so I'm forced to go with it, even though "Pulp Fiction" was great in a completely different way.

    But the acting was spectacular in "American Beauty," and the humor perfect and biting. The last lines are incredible and some of my favorite of all time. And every time I watch it I walk away feeling like I've learned something, or been changed in some way. When I watch "Pulp Fiction," I just walk away entertained.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Pulp Fiction without a doubt

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  • 1 decade ago

    Pulp Fiction

    take care

    dave

  • 1 decade ago

    Pulp fiction all the way Tarantino is the best

  • 1 decade ago

    Pulp Fiction, hands down. When it was first released, no one had ever heard dialogue and seen narrative structure presented in the way that Tarantino's masterpiece did.

    American Beauty, on the other hand, dissects its characters’ feelings and themes in the most obvious dialogue exchanges possible. “Here’s what our movie is about!” shouts Benning. “I’ll tell you the damn theme; you don’t tell me!” counters Spacey. On and on it goes, obviously caking the walls of the loveless house with queues for each character’s angst. It’s pop-up factoid drama. An emotional paint-by-numbers. See, their house has red, white, and blue colors! GET IT? The gay-bashing war veteran is actually a closet homosexual! AREN'T WE CUTTING EDGE? It’s as if Mendes didn’t want anyone to leave the theater without being able to write a research paper on the film.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I prefer Pulp Fiction.

  • 1 decade ago

    American Beauty

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Pulp Fiction by a longshot

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