Bre asked in Family & RelationshipsFamily · 1 decade ago

If an affidavit is signed at a child's birth, who can contest it down the line if questions arise?

The child is almost 7, and my sister is now questioning weather or not the man that she thought was her daughters' father, actually is. She is wondering how to go about this situation, and find out. Neither one of us know the next step, or if she can even contest it now because she and the assumed father signed an affidavit when my niece was born. Hoping somebody can help.....Thanks

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    ummmm...

    Is "father" in the child's life at all? Is he paying support? If she answers yes to either one then she s probably out of luck... he is legally the father no matter what a DNA test says. In most places if the child has any sort of relationship to the man in question then no court will allow your sister to legally change his parental status and all his rights and cs payments will remain the same She is going to have to hire a lawyer for this one because i can promise you it is going to be a mess.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Do a DNA test before starting any kind of legal paperwork.

    You may find your sister was originally correct, and then there's no need to worry about this.

    If the DNA test results prove differently, then your sister will need to contact your County Health Dept. Records and begin filing "correction paperwork". Sometimes this requires an attorney, sometimes it doesn't.

    Best of luck (and find out asap for the child's sake!)

  • 1 decade ago

    dna test with child and possible father. if she knows who the other person is, she can talk to them too. be careful, the little girl is 7 and if shes told now the person she thought was daddy isnt, it could be terrible for her. if it came back the child is not fathered by the man signing the papers, a court would easily take care of that. gotta have the blood test for proof though.

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