What is the difference between sarcasm and sardonicism?

The dictionary gave one of those unhelpful definitions, so I'm looking for more of an explanation/example.

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  • Jay
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    The two words are virtually synonymous.

    "Sarcastic" implies an intentional inflicting of pain by deriding, taunting, or ridiculing <a critic known for his sarcastic remarks>.

    "Sardonic" implies scorn, mockery, or derision that is manifested by either verbal or facial expression <surveyed the scene with a sardonic smile>.

    To be "sardonic" is, perhaps, a bit more subtle than being "sarcastic." You do not often hear mention of a "sarcastic" facial expression.

    One who makes sarcastic remarks is exhibiting more bitterness than one who is merely being sardonic, I'd say.

  • 6 years ago

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    RE:

    What is the difference between sarcasm and sardonicism?

    The dictionary gave one of those unhelpful definitions, so I&#39;m looking for more of an explanation/example.

    Source(s): difference sarcasm sardonicism: https://biturl.im/HBge7
  • 7 years ago

    sardony the better noun, and connotation to me is that sarcasm more mean, sardonic maybe a little gentler; I often tease like "let me know how that works out" or "shocker"; somewhere between ironic and sardonic? Phi Beta Kappa Yale English major; not dummy I if I focus, tho do get less sharp by the minute.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Sarcasm means "Witty language used to convey insults or scorn". To be sardonic means "To be disdainfully or ironically humorous; scornful and mocking" (The word 'Sardonism' does not appear in the Oxford dictionary). So, based in the word "malicious", sarcasm gets my vote.

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  • 4 years ago

    Sardonicism

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