30+ mpg for cars in 2012?

I have been hearing that in 2012 all new cars being sold in the market have to have 30+ mpg in the United States. My question is: Will they be able to do this with trucks and suv's? What about sports cars? I always hear that car companies have the technology to make cars that could run 50mpg. No hybrid. Though i find it hard to believe because if you look at the escalade hybrid it only goes 20mpg.

Anyways, do you think they will put out a 30mpg truck and suv?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Well, the last time that Congress set the fuel economy standards, was back in 1975, so moving the bar up from 25mpg for cars (27.5mpg fleet) to 35mpg after 32 years shouldn't be much of a problem.

    The new fuel economy standards are part of H.R. 6, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, signed by President Bush on Wed. Dec. 19, 2007.

    The signing speech: http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2007/12/20...

    Bill H.R. 6 information: http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/D?d110:6:./l...

    The fuel economy portion is also called the "Ten in Ten Fuel Economy Act."

    Basically, beginning with the 2011 model year, the Sec. of Transportation (with input from the Sec. of Energy and the Administrator of the EPA) shall start moving the CAFE standard up annually, until in model year 2020 it is at or over 35mpg. The law doesn't state by how much it has to increase annually, just that it increases until 2020.

    Remember that the MPG listed on the Monroney label (window sticker, also listed at http://www.fueleconomy.gov/ ) isn't the fuel economy numbers used for the CAFE standards. CAFE uses the raw fuel economy numbers from the laboratory dynometer tests, but consumers only see the downward multiplied numbers to account for more "realistic driving."

    The CAFE standards are based on the city/highway average of the raw laboratory data, multiplied by the vehicle sales. The devaluation for the sticker/fuel economy label has no effect on the CAFE average. The more sales of a high-MPG vehicle, the more that'll balance out sales of a low-MPG vehicle... So production numbers will probably change to include more of the fuel efficient vehicles to outweigh the sales of the less fuel efficient ones. Just like how manufacturers currently can sell vehicles that are less than the 25mpg fleet average so long as you have others to balance you out, the change to 35mpg doesn't mean that all vehicles will have to be over 35mpg... Nothing about cars getting smaller or lighter or adding hybrid systems, but more about changing the mix of what is sold.

    BTW: look at the most fuel efficient SUV available in the US: the Ford Escape Hybrid/Mercury Mariner Hybrid/Mazda Tribute Hybrid, at 34 MPG city/31 MPG highway/32 MPG combined, which is better fuel economy than many cars! Ford is using a full-hybrid design, similar to that of Toyota. GM's two-mode hybrid design (as seen in the Escalade hybrid) and belt-alternator design are far inferior in terms of fuel economy and emissions.

    Source(s): http://www.epa.gov/otaq/cert/factshts/fefact01.pdf for more about fuel economy and CAFE (corporate average fuel economy) standards. You can view the raw EPA test data for various years, and an explanation of the columns, here: http://www.epa.gov/otaq/tcldata.htm
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  • 1 decade ago

    The only way I think that they might achieve a 30 mpg in a full sized truck would be a clean diesel hybrid.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I heard cars and trucks = 35 mpg (2020)

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  • 1 decade ago

    if companies try hard enough, which they aren't right now, it could definitely happen. In order for this to happen, the engines would have to be downsized majorly along with many other changes.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    its a monies game.. believe me, they all have the technology.. but as long as people are driving.. buying cars anyway.. they won't be as quick to manufacture..

    and when it might eventually lead up to the use of brilliant technologies.. they might as well squeeze every last dollar out of us.. because we have no choice anyway..

    Source(s): we see it every day..
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I dont see the future of cars as being gas powered. So yeah I think so!!

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  • 1 decade ago

    you can already get 50-70MPG if you drive correctly. i made a gas tank(12gallons) last me 600 miles in my ford probe. do the math, then learn how to drive gas effeciently. (following a tractor trailor close helps)

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