Yahoo Answers is shutting down on May 4th, 2021 (Eastern Time) and beginning April 20th, 2021 (Eastern Time) the Yahoo Answers website will be in read-only mode. There will be no changes to other Yahoo properties or services, or your Yahoo account. You can find more information about the Yahoo Answers shutdown and how to download your data on this help page.

Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 1 decade ago

What do Jews do when they go to their synagogue?

Christians go to church & listen to their preacher & sing, Muslims go to their mosque wash their hands, feet, & face & kneel & pray facing the Mecca, some religions offer sacrifices to their God(s) Goddess(es) but what exactly do Jews do when they go to synagogue?

13 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    In Judaism, prayer is done three times daily; once in the morning, once midday, and once in the evening before bed.

    Many men try to make it to Synagogue at least once daily, so they can pray with a group of ten people, or a what is known as a minyan.

    In Judaism: There are parts of prayer, in which we sit and stand, bow and sway. There is particularly one verse where we face East to pray towards Jerusalem where the Holy Temple was.

    During the "shema" we cover our eyes and state the first part of the prayer out loud, while reciting the second portion of it silently (almost like a whisper).

    During prayer, men wear tefillin and tallit.

    Tefillin are a pair of black leather boxes containing scrolls of Torah verses in them. There are hand tefillin (shel yad), which are worn by Jews wrapped around the arm, hand and fingers, in a particular way. There is also the head-tefillin (shel rosh), which is placed above the forehead.

    They serve as a sign and remembrance that God brought the children of Israel out of Egypt.

    Tallit, or prayer shawls are worn during morning prayers, and on the holidays and Shabbat. Tefillin however, are not worn on Shabbat and high holidays.

    Women and men are separated during prayer, through a divider known as a mechitza (this is in Orthodox circles).

    On Shabbat, the cantor sings prayers in Hebrew, while people recite them personally. People bow and sway, sit and stand in accordance with where the cantor is in prayer recitation. They also recite the prayers personally.

    At some point during Shabbat services, the Torah is brought out and a weekly portion is read. Someone is usually called up to make a quick recitation, and after the Torah is put back away in the special place it was brought from.

    After prayers, the Rabbi gives everyone a lesson from the current portion of Torah read, and elaborates on a concept from that particular book.

    From there, some people go to have lunch, and some Synagogues offer lunches for the congregation.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    answer: pray, sing, study the Torah together, listen to a sermon, celebrate and then meet afterwards for more celebration.

    btw: sacrifices to gods and goddesses usually consists of fruit juice and a bit of cake or bread. An overwhelming majority of pagans find the thought of a blood sacrifice to be abhorrent.

  • 5 years ago

    What absolute rubbish, in the event that they stress whores and interior reach idiots to golf equipment and pubs; I doubt that any Jews is refused to a Synagogue. Are you Jewish? i do no longer think of you're, and that i do no longer think of you help Jews or everyone diverse. Your questions are based on organic hatred, perchance you ought to look into thoughts for your self or refer to Muslims particularly than act on what you have study on extremist a strategies-authentic sites.

  • 1 decade ago

    Sabbath (Shabbat) service:

    1) greetings, welcome visitors

    2) Songs and prayers to help us move gradually, but quickly, from our ordinary lives and into prayer.

    3) Pray for the sick

    3.5 Pray for the bereaved

    4) Pray silently - reading out of the prayer book.

    5) Move into prayers and recitations that move us from prayer and back into ordinary life

    6) Rabbi or member may give a talk about some aspect of the Torah (five books of Moses) or some other aspect of Jewish faith or life.

    There is more than one type of service: sabbath (friday night) sabbath (Saturday morning) Bar/Bat Mitzvah, New Years, Day of Atonement, and so on.

    And, there are different sects/versions of Judaism.

    Mine is American Reform. We believe that we must always be in relation to the people and society around us. We must react to changes in society by updating, with thought, our interpretation of the scripture. That is why we support gay weddings - although it is up to each rabbi to do or opt out of performing gay weddings.

    Our temple is very community minded, with committees dedicated to feeding the homeless, taking care of poor children (Jewish and non-Jewish) around the world.

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    most sit in nice chairs. There might be guitar music if it is a reformed synagogue. The rabbi will recite the sh-ma (hear o Israel...) Then he will take off his watch and lay it on the lectern (this means absolutely nothing). he will then offer a sermon. Then after the service everyone meets in the community room for tea, and baked goodies.

  • 1 decade ago

    Pray, sing some verses or parts of some prayers if there are tunes to them. Also listen to short lectures on what was read in the Torah service.

  • 1 decade ago

    They listen to sermons, read from the Torah, pray...pretty much the same thing people do in church.

  • ...
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Sing hymns in hebrew. Listen to their Rabbi speak. Not that different from Christianity, really. Except without Jesus. Or the New Testament.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Much the same... they sing and hear the reading of God's Word

  • DS M
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    I think Eliot K, expert in Judaism since birth, summarizes it well.

    ***Mine is American Reform. We believe that we must always be in relation to the people and society around us. We must react to changes in society by updating, with thought, our interpretation of the scripture. That is why we support gay weddings - although it is up to each rabbi to do or opt out of performing gay weddings.

    Our temple is very community minded, with committees dedicated to feeding the homeless, taking care of poor children (Jewish and non-Jewish) around the world.***

    As you see from His answer, God is not expect to speak or do anything.

    Like cat's meow, expert in Judaism since birth said, ***Atheism doesn't, strange as it may sound, violate Judaism; there are Jewish Atheists. As Atheism doesn't involve worshiping idols or other deities, and as Atheists can and do enjoy and respect the complex ethical structure within Judaism, there's not the conflict that one might expect to find.***

    The only way not to be in conflict with an Atheist is if

    monotheism and

    the scriptures

    aren't an issue.

    For example, Moo, below, rejected Judaism but still feels she is able to speak with authority about Judaism as she was born Jewish. As she includes herself and then doesn't include herself in the activities of the congregation, one can conclude that the decision to leave was hers and not the congregation's ....verifying cat's meow position that Moo did not need to leave the congregation as she would be required if she accepted the monotheist/Tanach position of Christians.

    This confusion of Moo's would never have taken place if God was still leading His people as the Torah observant described in the Torah. Moo would have witnessed the Living God and then had to say, "I don't believe what I heard with my ears and saw with my eyes."

    Therefore, Moo verifies there is a great deal of activity the synagogue but that she didn't witness God in the midst of the activity.

    Messianics Jews have one prayer and that would be that the other Jews would once more have services where God spoke like those recorded in the Tanach.

    Hope this helps

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.