different versions of the bible?!?!?

why are there different versions of the bible if its the same religion?!?!?!

10 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    There are some different translations, with different vocabulary for a different understanding, and aimed at different audiences.

    For example, the King James Version is a mouthful for some people, and is a little hard to understand because of the old English. But a New Living Translation uses similar words to get the same message across, and it's a little easier to understand.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    An Italian proverb has it that the "translator is a traitor." And that accounts for the great majority of differences between all translations; whether into English, or any other language other than the originals.

    There are a number of translation methodologies one can employ to translate scripture, thus the differences between the NASB and the NIV, or the RSV and the NLT, or the KJV and the Message.

    There are some source differences as well, though this is not as important as some people like to pretend. The Apocryphal, or, more properly deuterocanonical books (books of the second canon), are contained in the Septuagint. They do not appear in the MT.

    They are not given the same weight as the rest of scripture by either the Roman or Orthodox churches, but are read and studied; American protestants - evangelicals, mostly - ignore them altogether.

    In short, though there are differences in English versions of the Bible, you will find, for the most part, that the variations are of little or no consequence.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    That's like asking, "why are there so many different English versions of 'The Iliad' if there's only one English language?"

    But, if you need a more complete answer, read on:

    1) Language - modern language keeps changing. Some words still in use today have very different meanings than they did in the time of the King James Version (KJV), for example. Witness how, in the KJV Old Testament (OT), the word "meat" is used to refer to bread and the word "bread" is used to refer to meat! This is just one of the most obvious of a multitude of such changes in meaning. Modern translations ensure comprehension by modern readers.

    2) Source texts - archaeologists are continually making discoveries of more ancient, and more authentic, source texts. There is *still* no version that takes full advantage of the texts among the Dead Sea Scrolls, for example, and they were first discovered over 50 years ago. Modern, scholarly translations take advantage of the most recent and most authoritative source texts available.

    3) Scholarship - the knowledge of translating the ancient source manuscripts increases with time. Thus, a modern, scholarly translation is bound to be more consistently accurate than a scholarly translation of 400 years ago, or even 100 years ago.

    4) Translation methodology is important. Style ranges from a word-for-word literal translation (which tends to inaccuracies but is useful in study), to a thought-for-thought translation (which tends to be accurate but often displays over-interpretation as well as translation). There is a world of "gray area" between these two extremes.

    5) Content - though some versions strive for an "inclusive" canon, i.e. a bible that contains all books used by all major Christian sects, most display a very strong religious bias by including only a more restrictive canon. This can be seen by comparing the contents of the New American Standard Bible (restrictive canon) with the Oxford Annotated New Revised Standard Version (inclusive canon).

    6) $ - this is the most significant contributor to the many versions available today. Any publisher that produces a modern, scholarly translation can expect to earn a profit from publishing that work. Thus, publishers are continually producing such works in an effort to fill a niche in one of the above areas or simply in offering an improved (modernized) bible to replace a currently-filled niche. If producing a new version were a money-losing proposition, only a very few well-funded religious or university organizations would be making the financial effort to produce such works. We would likely have no more than 4 new translations every century under such cost-prohibitive conditions.

    Jim, http://www.bible-reviews.com

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 4 years ago

    Ask yourself: ‘What is my goal in reading the Bible? Do I want easy reading with less attention to accuracy? Or do I want to read thoughts that reflect the original inspired text as closely as possible?’ BeDuhn points out that the general public and many Bible scholars assume that the differences in the New World Translation (NW) are due to religious bias on the part of its translators. However, he states: “Most of the differences are due to the greater accuracy of the NW as a literal, conservative translation.” While BeDuhn disagrees with certain renderings of the New World Translation, he says that this version “emerges as the most accurate of the translations compared.” He calls it a “remarkably good” translation. Dr. Benjamin Kedar, a Hebrew scholar in Israel, made a similar comment concerning the New World Translation. In 1989 he said: “This work reflects an honest endeavor to achieve an understanding of the text that is as accurate as possible. . . . I have never discovered in the New World Translation any biased intent to read something into the text that it does not contain.”

    • Login to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The correct version of the bible is the Ethiopian Orthodox bible which includes all of the sacred scriptures, though there are many sacred books that have yet to be canonized. All other bible are deficient because they cut out sacred books, the worst offenders being the Protestants who have chopped out a third of the Old Testament

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Some....Some try to give you an understanding about God's word.

    But you should always read the King James Version

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    There is only ONE accurate English translation - King James Bible.

    ALL the rest have many many errors !

    May God bless you as you study His Word

    <:)))><

    Source(s): King James Bible
    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    linguistic differences primarily

    words are sometimes so uncertain - and especially with Hebrew and Greek one word can carry several different meanings. That makes for translation difficulties.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Protestants yanked out several books they didn't like...

    and those are the same people who tell you it's all the same bible, just different translation.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    "easy to read" versions ..some/many have a problem reading old-english (1611 KJV)

    ..not saying this is a good thing !

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.