Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 1 decade ago

A sentence reads, "I think Robert Mary Jane Andrea Lee Ann and I should be the members of the committee." No?

A sentence reads, "I think Robert Mary Jane Andrea Lee Ann and I should be the members of the committee." Not knowing how the different names are actually connected, how many commas must you add to the sentence to show that there will be five people on the committee

A. Four

B. Five

C. Two

D. Three

4 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    D. Three. No comma needed after the name before the "and."

    It will read "... Robert, Mary Jane, Andrea, Lee Ann and I ..."

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    A, four. The only way I can see to arrange the commas in that sentence so that there are five people (counting I) is "I think Robert, Mary Jane, Andrea, Lee Ann, and I should be the members of the committee." Technically speaking, the commas could be put between any of the names, so long as two names had two parts each, but this is the only I see that results in names I have heard of before.

  • 1 decade ago

    D, 3.

    Robert, Mary Jane, Andrea, Lee Ann and I

  • 1 decade ago

    It depends on which grammar rule you are going to follow with regards to lists in sentences. There has been a long-standing rule that requires a comma before the word "and." It is still considered grammatically correct to follow this rule. Though I'm not personally crazy about it, I would have to recommend you follow the newest rul which eliminates the last comma . In that case, you would have 3 commas - one after Robert, one after Mary Jane, and one after Andrea.

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