Why was the case Brown v. Board of Education important in the struggle for civil rights? ?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
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    The Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education, which in 1954 delivered a decisive blow to legal segregation in the United States, was rooted in a long line of legal battles over educational opportunities. The famous case marked the dramatic culmination of a strategic assault that began in 1848 when Benjamin Roberts filed suit against Massachusetts for refusing to allow his five-year-old daughter to enroll in a local all-white elementary school. Roberts's loss would be the first of many setbacks in the fight for equal education for black Americans, but this brave legal challenge provided an example for dozens of plaintiffs who would testify to the inadequacies and injustices of segregated education.

    From Shmoop Histroy/Civil Rights Movement

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  • 1 decade ago

    Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka overturned Plessy v. Ferguson (which created the separate but equal schools for whites & blacks)...Brown had that overturned, because schools were not equal.

    The Brown case was just a small step for integration, which was a focal point for the Civil Rights Movement. All things back there were considered "separate but equal"...from schools to restaurants to political buildings...but it obviously wasn't. The Civil Rights Movement was more than Rosa Parks on the bus, Dr. King marching on Washington...it was everyday people trying have a better life...people trying to get those people a better life...and struggle to get equality.

    Type in Civil Rights Movement...and there will be tons of stuff to read.

    Best of luck :)

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    The Brown case held that separate but equal schools based on race WAS INHERENTLY,meaning as established, were not fair and created an unfair education system for African Americans. This meant that the 14th amendment rights of those people, due process rights, were being violated. The court ordered that ALL schools which created this separate- but-equal system had to integrate their school systems with all deliberate speed. which created a huge problem because that all deliberate spped term was vague. It took 18 years fights with almost every southern state, some used massive resistance, like Virginia and closed their schools for up to 7 years- Prince Edward County. In the late 1960's early 1970's forced school bussing was used. Schools are no longer segregated by race, now they are segregated based on Economic Incomes and suburbs, middle/upper class people and cities, lower class kids.Do you think that the city and suburb kids are equal in their educational opportunities? dream on.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The court ruled that blacks must be allowed to attend the same schools as whites. It effectively ended the "separate but equal" standard that had existed since Reconstruction,under the Jim Crow laws.

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