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Is God against crop rotation?

Lev. 19:19

12 Answers

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  • Anama
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    sounds like not anti-rotation, just the mingling of seed. We can't have spelt and flax planted all higgelty piggelty can we? (sp?)

    Thomas Jefferson was pro crop rotation. Does US Founding Father trump OT? I'm not sure of the rules....

    Yikes! lightandyour"truth" took this one a bit too seriously did we?

    Source(s): p.s. anyone who uses modern crop seeding equipment breaks this rule. I live in farm country and it is not even notable (except for today) to see a couple of corn stalks out in a soy or clover field. I am also a celiac (gluten intolerant) and this is what we call "cross contamination" and why I can't eat mainstream oats! : ) p.s. My dog's name is Leviticus because he kept escaping the fence and breaking the local "dog laws". We hoped it would inspire him to "behave". He is the orig, "Marley" has NOTHING on him! lol!
  • 1 decade ago

    That would actually be in favor of crop rotation. It states don't plant two kinds of seed in the same field. The assumption is planting at the same time.

    This seems to be a primative understanding of crop rotation since different seeds can be from the same family.

  • ?
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    No. It does not say that rotating crops was wrong to do, it say "mingling" the seeds. Planting two crops mixed together. This is a practice that farmers today stay away from as well. By not mingling the seed, they keep their seed pure.

    "Ye shall keep my statutes. Thou shalt not let thy cattle gender with a diverse kind: thou shalt not sow thy field with mingled seed: neither shall a garment mingled of linen and woollen come upon thee."

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    GOOD FOR YOU!!!!! I too find that attitude insulting. Here in NYC, my wife and I have had Muslims try to bully us, too. Quite a few are cool people who just want to live their lives, but I can tell you that just going to the store with long, loose hair, jeans and a T-shirt or tank top offends some people in my neighborhood. I have had Muslim guys look at me like I'm breakfast, too, and I just think, "Yeah, if your wife dressed like this, you'd be used to it by now." I'm not exactly a supermodel, you know? My wife shaves her head, and Muslims of both genders have told her that it's a sin for a woman to be bald in their religion. Her stock response is, "Then I'm glad I'm not part of your religion. I'm glad I don't have to pretend I am in this country." She also tends to wear less than I do, and some of the women in my neighborhood act like they don't want to catch whatever it is she's got. She doesn't want to hear from them, either, so it's a win-win. Anyway, I'm glad you stood up for yourself. Fundamentalism and bullying need to be addressed no matter what flavor they are. It's because of attitudes like what we've encountered that I don't buy that version of "morality." If all the women around a man are all covered up because their bodies cause men to "sin" otherwise, then women who wear tank tops or cropped pants become erotically charged to those men. Those men have never been taught to restrain or trust themselves. Have you read the "Princess Sultana" books, by Jean Sasson? Sasson interviewed a Saudi Arabian princess with feminist ideas over several decades. In the first one, Princess Sultana talks about the first time she had to go out in a chador, with a veil over her face. She couldn't breathe. She let the veil slip so she could take a breath. Men *stared*. How exciting it was to see a woman's face in public! I am reminded of a men's magazine from the early 1900s, the turn of the last century. The theme of it was "bifurcated women." Do you know what that was? Women in *pants*. Lots of pictures of women in pants. Because men at that time never saw womens' legs outside of their own wives', just the sight of particularly daring actresses and models dressed in something that showed they had two legs was really exciting to them. I don't want to return to those days.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    You misunderstand the verse. It says two seeds at the same time. God actually commanded crop rotation.

    Lev 19:19 "You must obey all my laws. "Do not breed your cattle with other kinds of animals. Do not plant your field with two kinds of seed. Do not wear clothing woven from two different kinds of fabric.

  • 1 decade ago

    actually...the bible tells them exactly how to rotate the crops and the importance of rotating them...at one point it says not to even eat the crops you grow the first time you use a piece of land.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    So it would seem. Odd, since crop rotation is essential to successful farming.

  • 1 decade ago

    Leviticus and Numbers - codal laws which if not backed up later in the Bible have no application today.

    So no.

  • 1 decade ago

    Smith's Bible Dictionary, William Smith, 1884

    Sower, Sowing The operation of a sowing with the hand is one of so simple a character as to need little description. The Egyptian paintings furnish many illustrations of the mode in which it was conducted. The sower held the vessel or basket containing the seed in his left hand, while with his right he scattered the seed broadcast. The "drawing out" of the seed is noticed, as the most characteristic action of the sower, in Psalms 126:6; (Authorized Version "precious") and Amos 9:13; In wet soils the seed was trodden in by the feet of animals. Isaiah 32:20; The sowing season began in October and continued to the end of February, wheat being put in before, and barley after, the beginning of January. The Mosaic law prohibited the sowing of mixed seed. Leviticus 19:19; Deuteronomy 22:9.

    A second question dealing with engrafting relates to the permissibility, in Jewish law, of grafting branches from a wild olive onto the stock of a tame one. While grafting itself was well known in Israel during the Second Temple period, the grafting of diverse species is contrary to rabbinic principles. According to Leviticus 19:19, fields are forbidden to be sown with "mixed seeds"; a similar prohibition exists in Deuteronomy 22:9: "You shall not sow your vineyard with mixed seed, lest the fruit of the seed you have sown and the fruit of your vineyard be defiled." These were held by the rabbis to imply a prohibition against grafting between heterogeneous fruit trees. The Mishnaic tractate Kil'ayim (Diverse Kinds) deals in considerable detail with the prohibition of mixing heterogeneous "seeds," the crossing and yoking together of diverse animals, and against covering oneself with material composite of wool and linen, all topics mentioned in these passages in Leviticus and Deuteronomy (Leviticus 19:19; Deuteronomy 22:9-11). According to the principle of kil'ayim, "seeds" include the five species of grain (wheat, barley, oats, rye, and spelt), legumes, and greens whose roots or stalks are used for human consumption. Grafting is forbidden not only between trees containing edible fruit (ces. ma'akal) and those containing inedible fruit (ces. serak.), but also between different species of trees bearing edible fruit. Thus, we read in M Kil'ayim 1:4: "As for trees, the pear and the crustumenian pear, or the quince and sorb apple, do not constitute kil'ayim one with the other. The apple and the crab apple, or the peach and almond, or the jujube and lote, even though they are similar one to the other, yet constitute kil'ayim one with the other (in respect of grafting only)." We are further informed that "it is not proper to graft one tree onto a tree of another sort" and that "it is not proper to graft olive trees into the trunk of a date palm, because that would be tree to tree (of another sort)." Similarly, in Midrash Psalms 128 (257b) Rabbi Jehoshua B. Levi (circa 250) is reported to have said: "Your wife is like a grapevine within your house, your sons like olive seedlings (Psalm 128:3). Just as there is no grafting of olive trees (to trees of other kinds, so that fruits of different kinds are produced) there will be nothing reprehensible among your sons."

  • 1 decade ago

    Epic waste of 5 points.

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