Can she get a visa and stay in the US?

A close friend of mine is in the United States because she married a US Marine. She is originally from Ethiopia. The met in Bahrain where she was working as a maid. The fell in love and got married. She then came to the US with a document that stated that she was his wife. She is now on his military ID and she wants a visa for herself so that she can work and become independent. He won't process her papers though. He has become very controlling and he is not the same man that she married. They also have a child together. If she were to leave him and go back to the Middle East, could she take her baby? Or would he get the child? Would she have to go to the Ethiopian or Bahraini Embassy to get help?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    How Do I Apply for Immigration Benefits as a Battered Spouse or Child?

    Background

    Generally, U.S. citizens (USC) and Lawful Permanent Residents (LPRs) file an immigrant visa petition with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) on behalf of a spouse or child, so that these family members may emigrate to or remain in the United States. USCIS Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative is filed by the USC/LPR, the petitioner, on behalf of the family member who is the beneficiary. The petitioner controls when or if the petition is filed. Unfortunately, some U.S. citizens and LPRs misuse their control of this process to abuse their family members, or by threatening to report them to the USCIS. As a result, most battered immigrants are afraid to report the abuse to the police or other authorities.

    Under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) passed by Congress in 1994, the spouses and children of United States citizens or lawful permanent residents (LPR) may self-petition to obtain lawful permanent residency. The immigration provisions of VAWA allow certain battered immigrants to file for immigration relief without the abuser's assistance or knowledge, in order to seek safety and independence from the abuser. Victims of domestic violence should know that help is available to them through the National Domestic Violence Hotline on 1-800-799-7233 or 1-800-787-3224 [TDD] for information about shelters, mental health care, legal advice and other types of assistance, including information about self-petitioning for immigration status.

    What is the Legal Foundation?

    The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) is the law that governs immigration in the United States. The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) provisions relating to immigration are codified in section 204(a) of the INA. Rules published in the Federal Register explain the eligibility requirements and procedures for filing a self-petition under the VAWA provisions. These rules can be found in the Code of Federal Regulations at 8 CFR § 204. The Battered Immigrant Women Protection Act of 2000 (BIWPA) made significant amendments to section 204(a) of the INA. Self-petitions may be filed according to the amended requirements but adjudication may be delayed until rules are published.

    Who is Eligible?

    To be eligible to file a self-petition (an application that you file for yourself for immigration benefits) you must qualify under one of the following categories:

    Spouse: You may self-petition if you are a battered spouse married to a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident. Unmarried children under the age of 21, who have not filed their own self-petition, may be included on your petition as derivative beneficiaries.

    Parent: You may self-petition if you are the parent of a child who has been abused by your U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident spouse. Your children (under 21 years of age and unmarried), including those who may not have been abused, may be included on your petition as derivative beneficiaries, if they have not filed their own self-petition.

    Child: You may self-petition if you are a battered child (under 21 years of age and unmarried) who has been abused by your U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident parent. For more information, please see How Do I Bring My Child to Live in the United States?. Your children (under 21 years of age and unmarried), including those who may not have been abused, may be included on your petition as derivative beneficiaries

    What are the Basic Requirements?

    The self-petitioning spouse,

    Must be legally married to the U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident batterer. A self-petition may be filed if the marriage was terminated by the abusive spouse’s death within the two years prior to filing. A self-petition may also be filed if the marriage to the abusive spouse was terminated, within the two years prior to filing, by divorce related to the abuse.

    Must have been battered in the United States unless the abusive spouse is an employee of the United States government or a member of the uniformed services of the United States.

    Must have been battered or subjected to extreme cruelty during the marriage, or must be the parent of a child who was battered or subjected to extreme cruelty by the U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident spouse during the marriage.

    Is required to be a person of good moral character.

    Must have entered into the marriage in good faith, not solely for the purpose of obtaining immigration benefits.

    The self-petitioning child:

    Must qualify as the child of the abuser as "child" is defined in the INA for immigration purposes.

    Any relevant credible evidence that can prove the relationship with the parent will be considered.

    How Do I Apply for Benefits?

    To self-petition, you must complete and file USCIS Form I-360 (Petition for Amerasian, Widow(er), or Special Immigrant) and include all supporting documentation. Self-petitions are filed with the

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  • 3 years ago

    So i anticipate your mom replaced from a student visa to an H2B artwork visa. Her H2B visa relies upon on her company, no longer on you or your presence. i do not comprehend why she desires you to come back. so some distance because the position you need to stay, it sounds like it is more beneficial a question of custody than immigration. even as you're below 18 years previous, someone has custody of you. in the journey that your mom has sole custody it truly is quite a lot her say the position you stay. If she would not it receives more beneficial complicated.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The American legal system allows one to self-petition if the spouse abuses the applicant or refuces to process/sign the application. She needs to prove that the spouse is using his immigration power to abuse her. She should contact the domestic voilence office in the city that she lives. As for the child, it is much complicated as both parents can fight for the custody of the child. If she can prove that the child will be safe with her, she has a better chance of winning the custody case. That being said, if she married the person simply to get a legal status and she cannot wait even before she was legalized, the us citizen will likely fight and prove against her claim and therefore she will face the reality - which is get out.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    This is something she needs to talk to a lawyer about. About the child, they would do best interest of the child most likely the child would stay with the mother, but with moving our of the country I don't know. The child is a us citizen, so if you were to take the child to a different country it wouldn't be a citizen.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    depends on if the child was born in the U.S. IF the child was she could stay if not she could still get support. The judge always sides with the woman and her child. make him PAY. WELCOME TO THE U.S. BE A GOOD WORKER!

    Source(s): LIVED IT
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