can a deaf person drive a car?

jst want to know if a deaf person drives a car

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    yes

    Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to state and local governments, law enforcement, police officers, and state troopers. You have the right to a qualified interpreter when it is necessary to communicate effectively with a state trooper. Whether an interpreter is necessary depends on the communication abilities of you and the trooper, along with the length, importance, complexity, and the context of the communication.

    For example, an interpreter may be necessary if you were arrested and interrogated about a crime. A state trooper should honor your choice of communication method unless it would significantly interfere with the trooper’s job or other effective means of communicating are available. When you were pulled over by the state trooper, you and the state trooper were able to communicate effectively by writing on a pad of paper. An interpreter was not necessary and your rights were not violated.

    If you were not able to communicate effectively by writing on a pad of paper (or by reading the speeding ticket the state trooper may have given you), an interpreter may be necessary. If an interpreter is necessary, it may not be possible to have the interpreter meet you and the state trooper on the freeway. More likely, the state trooper would transport you to the police station to wait for an interpreter to arrive.

    For more information, see the NAD Position Statement on Law Enforcement, available online at http://www.nad.org/policeposition (Path: www.nad.org > Advocacy Issues > Law Enforcement > Position Statement). You can also view the memo about the obligations of law enforcement under the ADA (and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973) at http://www.nad.org/police (Path: www.nad.org > Legal Rights > Government > Police and Law Enforcement).

    You can also check out the following weblinks to the U.S Department of Justice Publications:

    *

    "Common Questions about the ADA and Law Enforcement”

    http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/q%26a_law.htm

    *

    “DOJ Law Enforcement Guide”

    http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/PCALawEnfGuide.htm

    Source(s): my cousin was born 100% deaf and drives
  • 4 years ago

    Not all emergency vehicles lights can be seen especially if that vehicle is on the other side of a building. The sirens are to warn you if you don't see the lights. Driving deaf should require a sensor in the car that informs the driver that sirens are active. This will not help them if someone is honking a warning at them but can possibly keep them from a collision with an emergency vehicle. It would depend upon the degree of deafness.

  • 1 decade ago

    Yes deaf persons are capable of driving a car. There may be different requirements in different states/countries. I had a lady customer at service station that I worked at who was deaf and she just had to be more alert (her radio was always on, clearly she didn't know it was). Besides, most able people don't listen and pay attention when they are driving anyway.

  • 1 decade ago

    yea they may just need a person in the car with them. this is how it was with my brother's friend and her mother. the mom was deaf and had to have someone in the car to let her know of sirens or something like that

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  • nosdda
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    A Quick answer is NO. They cannot hear the emergency horns or hear a car overtaking etc.

  • 1 decade ago

    yes

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    certainly. They function just like any other person who can hear.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Yes, they can.

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