What does "worship" mean?

What does "worship" mean to you? How do YOU worship? In the Christian Greek Scriptures (New Testament) the word "proskuneo" means "bow down like a dog", signifying obedience, and is only applied to rulers, whether human or divine. Other words are also rendered "worship"... show more What does "worship" mean to you? How do YOU worship?

In the Christian Greek Scriptures (New Testament) the word "proskuneo" means "bow down like a dog", signifying obedience, and is only applied to rulers, whether human or divine.

Other words are also rendered "worship" in the Greek Scriptures. These are:

"enopion", meaning "in the face of", respect applied to those in authority, at Luke 4:7
"doxa", meaning "give glory", sometimes translated as "honor", applying to rulers and parents, at Luke 4:8.
"latreuo", meaning "render homage", applied to gods, seen at Acts 7:42.
"eusebio", meaning "pious devotion", applied toward gods, seen at Acts 17:23.
"sebomai", meaning "adoration", applied toward a being of superior respect, seen at Acts 18:23.
"ethelothreska", meaning "self-imposed (service)", the doing of something not requested, apparently indicating false worship though of an acceptable being, used in negative reference at Colossians 2:23.

But what does all this mean? Many of these words and definitions have inexact meanings. For instance "bow down like a dog" means exactly what? Muslims take this literally as bowing down to God. It is also rendered "obeisance" (lit., obey-ance), meaning that one is offering themselves to do the will of the one being bowed down to.

So it still remains, Is it just gathering together? Is it praying? Is it doing some kind of task? Is it simply showing honor?
Update: Dictionary.com says this about "worship": –noun 1. reverent honor and homage paid to God or a sacred personage, or to any object regarded as sacred. 2. formal or ceremonious rendering of such honor and homage: They attended worship this morning. 3. adoring reverence or regard: excessive worship of... show more Dictionary.com says this about "worship":

–noun
1. reverent honor and homage paid to God or a sacred personage, or to any object regarded as sacred.
2. formal or ceremonious rendering of such honor and homage: They attended worship this morning.
3. adoring reverence or regard: excessive worship of business success.
4. the object of adoring reverence or regard.
5. (initial capital letter) British. a title of honor used in addressing or mentioning certain magistrates and others of high rank or station (usually prec. by Your, His, or Her).
–verb (used with object)
6. to render religious reverence and homage to.
7. to feel an adoring reverence or regard for (any person or thing).
–verb (used without object)
8. to render religious reverence and homage, as to a deity.
9. to attend services of divine worship.
10. to feel an adoring reverence or regard.

Origin:
bef. 900; (n.) ME wors(c)hipe, worthssipe, OE worthscipe, var. of weorthscipe; see worth, -ship; (v.) ME, deriv. of the n.
Update 2: "Praise" is not in itself "worship", as anyone can be praised for some great deed. "Singing" is not worship, as you can sing about anything. "Joy and shouting" is not worship, as one can shout for joy over anything. Together all those things can contribute to worship and can... show more "Praise" is not in itself "worship", as anyone can be praised for some great deed. "Singing" is not worship, as you can sing about anything. "Joy and shouting" is not worship, as one can shout for joy over anything. Together all those things can contribute to worship and can express worship, but is this the whole of worship?
Update 3: There are indeed two views of the word "proskuneo" (proskyneo), one being "bow down like a dog" and the other being "kiss the hand of [someone in reverence]". Neither has been established as the exact meaning and thus remains in dispute. The first comes from an interpretation of the... show more There are indeed two views of the word "proskuneo" (proskyneo), one being "bow down like a dog" and the other being "kiss the hand of [someone in reverence]". Neither has been established as the exact meaning and thus remains in dispute.

The first comes from an interpretation of the word coming from "pros", meaning "before/aface" and possibly from a variant of "kunesen", meaning "puppy".

The other view is that it comes from "pros" for "face" and the variation of a word I don't recall that means "extending the hand". Together it suggests putting the face to the hand.

Considering the tradition of the word "proskuneo" applying to bowing down before a ruler, I prefer the first rendering.
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