Les Miserables social comment...?

Does anyone know what are the things Victor Hugo's trying to say through the character Cosette? You know, like social comments? We're reading this book for school right now and I absolutely just fell in love with it...but I still gotta answer this question as a presentation so I'm hoping to get some ideas:) Thanks a lot!!

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Les Misérables (pronounced: /le miːzeʁabl(ə); translated variously from French as The Miserable Ones, The Wretched, The Poor Ones, The Wretched Poor, The Victims) (1862) is a novel by French author Victor Hugo, and among the best-known novels of the 19th century. It follows the lives and interactions of several French characters over a twenty year period in the early 19th century that starts in the year of Napoleon's final defeat. Principally focusing on the struggles of the main character, ex-convict Jean Valjean, who seeks to redeem himself from his past mistakes. The novel also examines the impact of Valjean's actions for the sake of social commentary. It examines the nature of good, evil, and the law, in a sweeping story that expounds upon the history of France, architecture of Paris, politics, moral philosophy, law, justice, religion, and the types and nature of romantic and familial love. Les Misérables is known to many through its numerous stage and screen adaptations, of which the most famous is the stage musical of the same name, sometimes abbreviated "Les Mis" or "Les Miz" (pronounced /leɪ ˈmɪz/).

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  • reust
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Les misérables by utilising Victor Hugo is surprising, readers could additionally prefer to evaluate the greater moderen unabridged translation by utilising Fahnestock and MacAfee; different than for being particularly greater organic to Anglophone ears, the latter additionally consists of translations of distinctive the French verses that Wilbour did no longer translate (e.g., see Saint Denis XII:6)

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    this study guide will answer your questions about this book

    http://www.bookrags.com/Les_Mis%C3%A9rables

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