Should I replace a 30+ year old furnace? ?

Is my current furnace still safe? I know it's probably not as cost efficient as a new one but my biggest concern is safety.

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks

8 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    there is a wide variety of older furnaces...some rarely present safety problems,,,others need to be checked and or cleaned regularly.... if it hasnt been checked by a qualified hvac tech lately then you should have that done..most companies will inspect a furnace [including minor cleaning] for $50-$90...old furnaces are not automatically unsafe just because they are old but they often dont have the extra safety devices that new furnaces have such as flame rollout switches and draft safety switches to shut furnace off if chimney or vent clogs...i recommend everyone with gas or oil heat,gas oven,fireplace,garage,etc have at least one carbon monoxide detecter in the home...if you have a co detecter and the furnace checks out ok,,no need to replace...as far as efficiency,,your old one is probably in the 60% -65% range,meaning 35%-40% of the heat produced by the flame is vented to the outside,,the rest is delivered to the home....a new standard furnace would be 80% efficient..for around $2000-$2500 installed,,or you could get a 90%+ eff furnace for around $3000-$3500 installed....this doesnt include central ac or any chimney work that a new 80% furnace might require...so you would save money but the payback time would be several years...also newer furnaces are more expensive to fix once they are out of warrenty and they will break more than an old one bacause they are more complex,,so get as long of a warrenty as they offer just in case....also the heat from newer furnaces doesnt feel quite as warm because the blower fan starts sooner [ before furnace is hot] ,runs longer after the burner is off,,and blows the air with more force through the ducts which creates slightly more noticable air movement in the home that some people dont care for....hope this helps,,,,,,,dan

    Source(s): in the biz
  • 3 years ago

    Old Furnace

  • 1 decade ago

    I started to have safety issues with my old furnace and, parts were unavailable. The old one was 64 years old but seemed to work O.K. then I started thinking of some wintry night on a Friday late, when the temp would be below zero with no one open.

    I replaced everything including some pipe work, put in two zones that really helped and it was $1750.00 for a Lennox boiler. Beautiful. It's small and out of the way, don't even know it's on.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Hard to tell without seeing it, but they are usually safe if taken care of. I never tell customers to replace for the sake of effeciency. Replace when the furnace dies. They can be replaced in a day. Perhaps not finished, but at least your house will not freeze. A good contractor will keep you warm. Have it inspected by a reliable contractor annually, and you will be fine.

    Source(s): Mechanical contractor. 35 yrs.
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 4 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Should I replace a 30+ year old furnace? ?

    Is my current furnace still safe? I know it's probably not as cost efficient as a new one but my biggest concern is safety.

    Any help would be appreciated. Thanks

    Source(s): replace 30 year furnace: https://biturl.im/liNw3
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    There are several things here to look at.One your furnace is obsolete.Wastes your money producing far less heat than a new one will.Another BIG thing is you may be able to write off your new furnace on your taxes Federal energy tax credits.A new furnace will pay for itself in a few years.It will also be under warranty again saving you money.I replaced my forced air furnace myself for $512.00 for everything I needed,Brand new.It took me all day,I did have it inspected and still saved $1400.00 bucks from quoted price.Good Luck.D

  • xenon
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Your old furnace is probably 45% efficient, the new ones are 90% + efficient, so your fuel bill will be cut in two.

    From a safety angle it's OK

  • 1 decade ago

    Check some prices here before the contractors try to hose you.

    http://www.alpinehomeair.com/heating/?asid=5253&gc...

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.