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Anonymous asked in Beauty & StyleFashion & Accessories · 1 decade ago

What is the main difference between a ''kimono'' and a ''yukata''?

I mean , how do you distinguish one from the other in the first look.

simple explanations would help because I need to know basically what the difference is rather than the details.

6 Answers

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  • Aya
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    There really is no simple explanation. However, you can generally identify a yukata versus any other kind of kimono by a few things:

    1) Season: If it's not summer, it's probably not a yukata. Yukata are very casual kimono meant to be worn in the summer or as bathrobes at places like hot springs.

    2) Material: If it's made of cotton it's probably a yukata. If it's not made of cotton it's probably not a yukata.

    3) The collar: A regular kimono has at least two collars. One sits up close to the neck, while the other is a bit lower in the front so the first collar can be seen clearly. Basically what you're looking at is the juba collar showing underneath the kimono collar. You don't wear a juban under a yukata, though, so there should only be one collar (some people attached decorative ruffles to yukata collars for fun, but it's a very different look that the appearance of a juban collar under a kimono collar).

    4) Footwear: You never ever ever go without socks with a kimono...except when you're wearing yukata. If the person you're looking at isn't wearing socks, the chances are much higher that you're looking at a yukata than a regular kimono. Some people might make exceptions for really fun patterned socks, though, so this isn't always the best way to tell.

    5) Really crazy decorative stuff, like heko obi (soft, scarf-like wraps as opposed to the stiffer, flat obi), false obi jime, or an obi that has been twisted or folded in the front to show off the color on the reverse side. Heko obis might be used on their own, which is something you would never see with other kinds of kimono except possibly on small children. Some people also use them in conjunction with a regular obi to look more decorative. If someone is wearing an obi jime, look to see if it seems to be holding any part of the obi bow in place. On a regular kimono the obi jime is both decorative and useful (it helps hold the bow together), but on a yukata it's just decorative. If you see an obi that's twisted or folded in the front, you're almost definitely looking at a yukata, because you wouldn't do that kind of thing at all with a regular kimono.

    Source(s): I collect kimono (all kinds) and study proper kimono wearing.
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  • 3 years ago

    Yukata Vs Kimono

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  • dakch
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Yukata Kimono

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  • 4 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/axS98

    Edward got his fabrics reversed. KIMONO generally come in silk, but they can also be made of wool, polyester, and some other fabrics, but never cotton. YUKATA are made of cotton and are always unlined. Yukata are like the super-casual t-shirt and jeans of kimono. They can only be worn during the summer for the various summer festivals, or as bathrobes at hotels and hot springs (though these days you'll find that the style used for bathrobes and the style used for wearing out in public are different). Kimono, on the other hand, are automatically more formal and the different styles of kimono span the range from casual (e.g. spending a day out in town) to ultra-formal (e.g. evening gowns and wedding gowns). Yukata in general require far fewer accessories than a kimono -- only a kimono slip, a couple of ties to hold everything together, a hanhaba or heko obi, and a pair of geta. A kimono requires a juban (under-kimono), obi ita, obi makura, several ties, obi age, obi jime, tabi, and zori, and people may also choose to add false decorative collars known as han eri or kasane or date eri to their outfits. The obi, obi age, and obi jime must match the kimono in terms of season and formality. Speaking of season, on a kimono the pattern, weight of the fabric, and presence or absence of lining are determined by the season in which a particular kimono is to be worn. A yukata is a yukata by virtue of its fabric, so it will never be lined and it's not unusual to see sping, autumn, or winter patterns on a yukata even though it is techinically a summer garment.

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  • 5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    What is the main difference between a ''kimono'' and a ''yukata''?

    I mean , how do you distinguish one from the other in the first look.

    simple explanations would help because I need to know basically what the difference is rather than the details.

    Source(s): main difference kimono yukata: https://biturl.im/zTkgV
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Well, the simple definition of "yukata" is a casual, summer kimono.

    In terms of look... I guess the simpler it is, the more likely it is to be a yukata. Yukata has one layer, kimono sometimes has several (depending on type, I guess?). It's possible to put on a yukata yourself without help; that's utterly impossible for more formal kimono.

    Also, according to Wikipedia, "unlike formal kimono, yukata are typically made of cotton rather than silk or synthetic fabric, and they are unlined" (whatever unlined means...).

    Finally, if you see someone (especially someone young) wearing a yukata/kimono-like garment on the street, it's more likely a yukata. Real kimono are somewhat formal and restrictive.

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