Is the Universe 90 billion light years across ?

7 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    It is a question of mundane simplicity but one that has stumped history’s greatest geniuses: How big is the universe? This year a group of astrophysicists has deduced an answer: The visible universe stretches at least 24 gigaparsecs in all directions. That’s a radius of 78 billion light-years to the less versed.

    Neil Cornish, an astrophysicist at Montana State University, and his colleagues got their result by mining data from the cosmic microwave background, ubiquitous radiation left over from the Big Bang. Using the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, Cornish earlier helped determine that the universe is 13.7 billion years old. That age tells how long light from the Big Bang has been traveling and so provides a clue to the size of the universe—but it’s not the whole story.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    That's the current estimate. Although the Universe is only 13.7 billion years old (or so) and nothing can go faster than light, apparently space is able to expand faster than light and though it would seem that a 27.4 billion light year wide universe is all that we have had time for, the expansion of space has made the actual size of the universe over three times the 'diameter' that we'd have expected.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Well, nobody actually knows that much about our Universe. We know much less than 1% of our Universes secrets. Most things that Scientists say about the Universe is just an educated guess and is not proven. Also, the Universe is always expanding. One couldn't imagine how anything could be infinite. Is the Universe just expanding into Space that is not any part of the Universe and is somehow just there?? On a rough I would say that you are correct yes. But I will never say anything firmly about the Universe because anything is possible and we are not advanced enough to answer such questions. :)

    • Login to reply the answers
  • cosmo
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Yes, in the following, technical sense: the material that we currently see on our event horizon 13.7 billion lightyears away is "now" 45 billion lightyears away, because of its motion since the Big Bang.

    It is perfectly possible for distant objects to move faster than light with respect to each other. This is in no way forbidden and does not result in causal paradoxes.

    The Universe is certainly larger than 90 billion ly in diameter---there definitely is material outside our event horizon, perhaps an enormous amount of material (perhaps infinite) that is much further than 90 billion ly. Early inflation predicts the region that is like the material inside our event horizon is at least 10^21 lightyears in radius.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Alex S
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Yes. The current estimate is 94M light years. That's however just

    the visible universe. Or better: The *currently* visible universe.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    It is about 6 billion light years in radius.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    We cannot measure the distance "across" the universe because there is no "across." The universe is infinitely expanding in every direction. This is what makes it so mysterious.

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.