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Will Knuckling Over In My Pit Bull Go Away As He Ages Or Will It Get Worser?

Because My Uncle Say He Not Paying For Any Surgery He Will Just Put Him To Sleep he about 8 to 9 weeks now

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  • 1 decade ago
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    http://www.greatdanelady.com/articles/knuckling_ov...

    I hate to be lazy about answering a question, but I don't know the full circumstances (such as how old; if this is a puppy) and here is a page that has a lot of information on it.

    ***I know you wrote Pit Bull, but I'm sure this condition is worse for Great Danes given their size but this does deal with the issue of knuckling under.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It's most likely just his puppy walk, but if it helps, take some ace wrap and wrap around his foot. Keeps him from damaging his tiny feet and will help keep his feet straight rather than knuckling over. They also have puppy booties that have the same effect if you have trouble with the ace bandaid. If he can't correct it, I would be prepared to call a rescue. They might be able to help with a surgery and help you keep your pit, or help find him a home if needed. Its better than being putting down, though it does suck. There are many people that help support pit bull owners because of there reputation.

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  • 1 decade ago

    breeds have also been known to show signs of knuckling over and doctors are not always immediately sure what causes the problem. They're not completely in the dark, though, and are fairly certain that one of two things can lead to knuckling over in dogs. One is some kind of neurological disease that leads to paralysis. The most likely candidate if your vet suspects a neurological disease is Degenerative Myelopathy; in this disease, the dog's spinal cord slowly dies, causing gradual paralysis. One of the hallmark signs of the disease is the dog dragging his back feet; the rear legs get weaker and weaker and after several weeks they are completely paralyzed. There is unfortunately no treatment for this disease and dogs are often euthanized. A definitive diagnosis of Degenerative Myelopathy can only be made via autopsy, after the dog is dead.

    Another, much less serious issue that can lead to knuckling over, and which can be resolved, has to do with nutrition; some experts claim that genetics plays no role, while others say that genetic factors influence the development of knuckling over even in this case. With nutritional causes of knuckling over, the legs of a dog look like they're made of rubber and bend in all sorts of uncomfortable looking positions. Many breeds that grow quickly at the beginning of their lives will develop mild knuckling over as puppies because assimilation of minerals and nutrients may not be able to keep up with the growth rate of the dog. In many breeds, the problem will resolve itself without any outside intervention. In certain cases, though, bones and tissues grow at an uneven rate and the muscles, ligaments and tendons of the legs are not properly formed; this can be caused by imbalances in the dog's diet and missing minerals. Some breeders believe that high protein diets are the culprits, while others believe that the critical element is a highly erratic, unbalanced diet that is not in proportion to the amount of exercise a dog gets. An imbalance in calcium and phosphorous, furthermore, could lead to Rickets in the dog, which is another nutritional cause of knuckling over. You should talk to your vet about the proper diet

    • che5 years agoReport

      Great info!!!!

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  • 1 decade ago

    knuckling over will not go away. are you sure he is actually knuckling over or is it just the growth plate? Usually they will be visible until at least 8 or more months in large breed puppies.

    Here are some pictures of puppies who actually ARE knuckling over.

    http://www.greatdanelady.com/articles/knuckling_ov...

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  • Gator
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    I may get worse. Don't put him down-- surrender him to a shelter. And tell your uncle he shouldn't have dogs if he's not willing to give it the proper care it needs. Sometimes that means surgery.

    Source(s): Pit owner.
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  • 1 decade ago

    L2English.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Poorly bred dog, take it back to the backyard greeder and get your money back.

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