United States Presidential Elections?

could someone please describe the process from the conventions where candidates from each party are chosen to the announcement of the winner, ITS URGENT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! thx

Update:

I probably should have started by saying I am not american hence I while I may see what the news has to say from the little international news I get to watch, I would not understand the constitutional context of ur election process. S o please pardon my ignorance and 4 heaven's sake please give some substantial detials. I woul just like to have an outline of th eprocess and

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    The candidates start out needing to win the primaries, which are elections where you vote by party. When a person goes in to vote in a primary, they must declare themselves a Democrat or Republican (or Independent or whatever) and those are the only names they vote on.

    Once the primary results are in, the candidate with the most votes (normally) is named the candidate at that party's convention. (The primary candidates actually earn "delegates" that add up to a win of support of the leaders in that party. The Democrats have super delegates as well that are not part of any state's Democratic party, but they count as votes of support towards the person becoming the candidate for the party. Republicans don't have super delegates, just the regular ones for each state.)

    Once they are nominated officially at that party's convention, then they start to run their official campaign against the candidate chosen by the other party.

    At that point, the candidates run against each other on the first Tuesday in November. They do not win through the popular vote, though. The popular vote in any state only chooses who the members of the electoral college in that state will vote for. The electoral college votes are determined by state population. On election night, those are the votes they are counting. Usually the popular vote and the electoral vote declare the same winner, although this is not always true.

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  • 3 years ago

    The Electoral college is what determines the end result now no longer the conventional vote there may be additionally the project of absentee and army balloting -- if the a sort of states and localities announce their Presidential vote tallies that deprives people who solid absentee ballots and vote-from-Afghanistan ballots of participation in the unfastened democracy considering that u . s . has on the least 5 time zones (Alaska & Hawaii severe West; Pacific; Mountain; necessary; eastern) you likely would be envisioned to no longer unencumber the Eventual winner effect different than all have voted in the farthest Western factors -- i think of that Guam and American Samoa ought to count because of the fact the 1st voters and not the for sure modern-day time zone to return in once you reside in the eastern Time Zone do no longer assume to appreciate the winner at the same time as you fall off to sleep after or around 11:fifty 9 p.M. in spite of the fact that if instead a at the same time as on day after at present (Nov. 7, 2012)

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  • 1 decade ago

    Well if you're asking what happens after the convention and before the announcement of the winner that's easy.

    The candidates campaign for votes and participate in debates. Then the public votes, the electoral collage votes, the numbers are tabulated and then winner announced.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Look up the Electoral College.

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  • 1 decade ago

    So urgent that you waited til the night before to do your homework, huh? You're on the internet, right? Use that thing called a search engine...

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  • 1 decade ago

    Did you completely miss out on the past two years of news coverage?

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  • 1 decade ago

    Go to readabook.com

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  • 1 decade ago

    This is so old

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