Look up in the sky, it's a bird, it's a plane ORIGIN?

Where was this first used? i hear it everywhere.. i want to know it's origin...

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  • J.S.
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Superman

  • 4 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Look up in the sky, it's a bird, it's a plane ORIGIN?

    Where was this first used? i hear it everywhere.. i want to know it's origin...

    Source(s): sky bird plane origin: https://biturl.im/n6SVX
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I first heard it in the Superman TV series of the 1950s, starring George Reeves. It was part of the opening of every episode. First the narrator starts with this intro:

    "Faster than a speeding bullet, more powerful than a locomotive, able to leap tall buildings in a single bound."

    Then you see a crowd of people pointing at the sky, and four different voices deliver these lines:

    "Look, up in the sky!"

    "It's a bird."

    "It's a plane".

    "It's Superman!"

    [Then the narrator voice-over continues:]

    "Yes, it's Superman! Strange visitor from another planet who came to earth with powers and abilities far beyond those of mortal men. Superman, who can change the course of mighty rivers, bend steel with his bare hands, and who, disguised as Clark Kent, mild-mannered reporter for a great metropolitan newspaper, fights a never-ending battle for truth, justice, and the American way."

    That's from memory. I may have some details wrong. I used to recite a version that stayed with the original right up to the last three words, then substituted "corn on the cob" instead of "the American way."

    REVISED. Thanks, unodrummer, for pointing out the omission!

    • Dan D5 years agoReport

      It actually appears in the 1941 Fleischer Brothers Superman cartoons. http://saratogaconcepts.com/superman.html

  • 1 decade ago

    You left out "strong as a freight train," and "faster than a speeding bullet."

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  • 5 years ago

    No, not strong as a freight train, but "More powerful than a locomotive" as I recall.

  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    Informative discussion, just what I was searching for.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    "Letterman" on Electric Company!

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