My group is trying to explain how a film camera produces images and our presentation.?

our presentation needs to be longer so we are deciding to do an experiment... does anyone know any experiments which show how light is being produced or any other ways to make the presentation longer

ii know you may find this pathetic but im asking you to bear me and help me. thank you.

Update:

our presentation needs to be longer so we are deciding to do an experiment... does anyone know any experiments which show how a camera uses light to produce the image or any other ways to make the presentation longer

ii know you may find this pathetic but im asking you to bear me and help me. thank you.

2 Answers

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  • Ivan A
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    You need an experiment that shows how an image is produced. All that the film does is to record the intensity of light of a projected image. A cheap way to do is is to get a magnifying glass (or any other positive lens) and try to project the image of a light bulb filament on a screen, that should be easy by the way of showing how an image is formed. Eyeglasses are not positive lenses, by the way.

  • 1 decade ago

    The "best" way to illustrate how a camera and film create an image is to make a "pinhole camera."

    The basic idea of a camera is that it is a box with a hole in it. The hole allows light to enter the closed box and the light strikes the back of the box. To record an image, a piece of film is placed on the back wall of the box. Light enters the hole and an inverted image of the "scene" outside the box is recorded. The length of time it takes to create a "proper" exposure depends on the brightness of the scene, the size of the hole, and the sensitivity of the film. The size of the hole also impacts the depth of field and focus.

    It isn't necessarily possible to have an active display to illustrate this happening as it would take a set amount of time to expose the film and then the film would have to be developed and then printed.

    What you could do is have a display that has a "cutaway" version of a pinhole camera so that viewers can see what is happening inside. Use colored string running into the box and to the film plane to illustrate how the light travels.

    The next step is to explain how modern cameras take those basic principles and refine them so that the photographer has precise control over every aspect of the photo, including framing (with the lens), exposure (with aperture, shutter, and ASA/ISO control), and in the case of motion-pictures, control over relative "speed" (control of frames per second).

    ALL of these basic aspects of photography are available in just about any photography book, but I've included some links below that may help you.

    Good luck!

    Brian Dzyak

    Cameraman/Author

    IATSE Local 600, SOC

    http://www.whatireallywanttodo.com

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