Are the new security scanners in airports really necessary, or are they the biggest invasion of privacy every?

They're being tested in a few cities, including Richmond, VA. If you are selected for a random search, they do the body scan that basically allows them to actually see your body without clothes. Not to be crude, but nipples and genitalia are visible, as are all the parts that we use our clothes to cover. They... show more They're being tested in a few cities, including Richmond, VA. If you are selected for a random search, they do the body scan that basically allows them to actually see your body without clothes. Not to be crude, but nipples and genitalia are visible, as are all the parts that we use our clothes to cover. They can focus in so close as to even see the pores in your skin.

The person doing the scan can't see the screen, and the person who's looking at the scan can't see you, but still, a stranger is looking at your naked body.

The reason for using these scanners is to find plastic explosives.

Is this going too far?
Update: Since someone with my same name is a terror suspect, I get a secondary screening every time I fly. I'm absolutely mortified at the prospect of going through security now.
Update 2: I must say that I'm surprised at these responses. Most airports already have the technology to detect explosives, including plastic explosives, and the standard metal detectors do an excellent job of finding other weapons. The new machine saves only one step-- inspection of shoes. Now would you rather take... show more I must say that I'm surprised at these responses. Most airports already have the technology to detect explosives, including plastic explosives, and the standard metal detectors do an excellent job of finding other weapons. The new machine saves only one step-- inspection of shoes. Now would you rather take off your shoes or be seen naked by strangers?
Update 3: Oldman, my feeling is that if I'm required to do this every time I get on a plane just because my very common first and last name comes up on a terrorist list, then there's something wrong. By the way, I'll be refusing the scanner and submit to a full pat down. At least that's not made part of the... show more Oldman, my feeling is that if I'm required to do this every time I get on a plane just because my very common first and last name comes up on a terrorist list, then there's something wrong. By the way, I'll be refusing the scanner and submit to a full pat down. At least that's not made part of the TSA's computer record and won't be seen floating around on the Internet.
Update 4: If you really think about it, passengers are probably the least likely to bring explosives onto a plane these days. What about all those baggage handlers and mechanics who go onto the plane and work on the plane. Will they be scanned each time they approach a plane?
Update 5: "If you don't like it, don't fly."???? If this attitude is the majority in the US, then you can kiss your rights good-bye. I suppose that if they start DNA checks at security points, that should be OK too? How about tattooing barcodes on all citizens? I'm absolutely flabbergasted that so... show more "If you don't like it, don't fly."???? If this attitude is the majority in the US, then you can kiss your rights good-bye. I suppose that if they start DNA checks at security points, that should be OK too? How about tattooing barcodes on all citizens? I'm absolutely flabbergasted that so few people seem to draw the line at such an intrusive act as showing their nude bodies to get on a plane.
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