Now that the California Supreme Court has agreed to hear three challenges to Prop 8, do you better understand?

How the legal system works?

The California Supreme Court accepted three lawsuits seeking to nullify Proposition 8, a voter-approved constitutional amendment that overruled the court's decision in May that legalized gay marriage.

All three cases claim the measure abridges the civil rights of a vulnerable minority group. They argue that voters alone did not have the authority to enact such a significant constitutional change. The California Supreme court thinks these three particular challenges warrant consideration.

What do you think?

14 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    FINALLY! honestly why was it ever put to vote?

  • April
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    I'm not a lawyer, but from what I hear it might have good legal basis. The idea is that Prop 8 did not follow the rules because marriage was laready legal here in California. In order to make such a sweeping change in the constitution a revision is needed, and like you said, that takes 2/3 approval. With Democrats having a majority (by 10) in the Senate and a majority (by 16) in the House, a 2/3 is unlikely. I hope that this thing goes down in flames. It seems to obvious to me that same sex couples should have the same rights and responsibilities as opposite sex couples.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Since it takes a 2/3 majority of Senators in CA, then I'd say a simple majority of voters don't have the power to amend the constitution and the ballot initiative system if flawed. May be good for other things, but not such important things as constitutional amendments.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It's great. Civil liberties should NEVER be put up for vote. And the rights of a minority should never be left at the hands of a majority. The proposition should never have happened.

    C'mon, CA Supreme Court! Do the right thing... AGAIN!

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  • Axl
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    I think it's great. And I agree that such a huge change in a constitution shouldn't be in the hands of voters, unless a very large majority is pro proposition 8, but that's not the case here.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I think that Proposition 8 will be nullified and reversed by the CSC. It is unconstitutional to discriminate against a minority.

  • J.P.L.
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    I find it fantastic that they're listening to us. At the same time I think it sad for our government to only listen to us when we threaten them. Something like proposition 8 should never have been left up to the public. I think the legal system needs a lot of tweeking until it's perfect or any where near that.

  • 1 decade ago

    I think that Prop. 8 is unconstitutional, and that voters shouldn't be able to make decisions on others' lives. Would heterosexuals like it if we made a proposition banning heterosexual marriage? No.

    Source(s): BTW, I'm writing a persuasive essay on this subject for English. If you have any ideas, please email them to me @ hectic_life91@yahoo
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It has always been up to the courts to protect minorities from opression by the majority.

  • sigurj
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    This situation is proof that the majority of American voters do not have the ability to make intelligent policy decisions.

  • Theta
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    I called it. ^~ I just hope they manage to over turn this hideous amendment sooner rather than later.

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